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I am using lazy loading to load information about the support ticket which a ticket message belongs to. TicketMessage is the child of Ticket. In my TicketMessage class I have the following code to lazy load the Ticket object when the Ticket property of the TicketMessage object is referred to:

// Lazy loading of Ticket object
private Ticket _Ticket { get; set; }
public Ticket Ticket
{
    get
    {
        return this._Ticket ?? (this._Ticket = new Ticket(TicketID, ClientID, ConnectionString, Person.PersonID));
    }
}

However I am experiencing behaviour that indicates that this object is being every time the TicketMessage class is instantiated, thus resulting in some unwanted null reference exceptions. Is there anything blatantly wrong with my lazy loading pattern?

share|improve this question
1  
Put a breakpoint inside the getter and see who is calling it. – lc. Jan 21 '13 at 10:20
    
Looks ok (although a field would probably be enough for _Ticket instead of a property). Try setting a breakpoint in the getter and see where the stack trace takes you. – Joachim Isaksson Jan 21 '13 at 10:20
    
can you show the full class – Imran Rizvi Jan 21 '13 at 10:21
    
I suppose the Person object is null in your code. – Oleg Ignatov Jan 21 '13 at 10:24
1  
What's the call stack on your exception? – Rawling Jan 21 '13 at 10:39
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would say your NRE problem is more likely to be Person being null rather than an issue with the null-coalescing operation.

That being said, I don't particularly like the idea of doing an assignment in that way. From a readability point of view it would be much clearer written as:

private Ticket _ticket;
...
public Ticket Ticket
{
    get
    {
        if (this._ticket == null)
        {
            this._ticket = new Ticket(TicketID, ClientID, ConnectionString, Person.PersonID);
        }
        return this._ticket;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
What makes you say that? Wouldn't the Person object be throwing the exception instead in that case? – Maritim Jan 21 '13 at 11:00
1  
@Maritim so, if Person is null the NRE would be thrown in the Ticket getter method, more specifically at the call to new Ticket. – James Jan 21 '13 at 11:03
    
But when stepping through the code it appears that the Ticket getter method of the TicketMessage class is never called. – Maritim Jan 21 '13 at 11:28
    
@Maritim which line does the debugger flag up when the exception occurs? That usually indicates exactly which object is null. – James Jan 21 '13 at 11:35
    
string Sender = (ticketMsg.Direction == 2 ? this.Department.Name + " <" + this.Department.EmailAddress + ">" : ticketMsg.Person.FirstName + " " + ticketMsg.Person.LastName + " <" + ticketMsg.Person.EmailAddress + ">"); So it is indeed the Person object. – Maritim Jan 21 '13 at 13:13

Don't make _Ticket as a property. Try this:

private Ticket _Ticket = null;

public Ticket Ticket
{
    get
    {
        return this._Ticket != null ? this._Ticket : (this._Ticket = new Ticket(TicketID, ClientID, ConnectionString, Person.PersonID));
    }
}
share|improve this answer

The issue at the Person.PersonID call, you should be sure that this object is initialized.

The .Net 4 has a perfect class Lazy<>

private Lazy<Ticket> ticket = new Lazy<Ticket>(() => new Ticket(TicketID, ClientID, ConnectionString, Person.PersonID));

public Ticket Ticket
{
    get { return ticket.Value; }
}
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