Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm having some issues trying to serialize/deserialize a complex object graph using protobuf-net.

I'm working on a legacy application and we're using .Net Remoting to connect a GUI client to a C# service. We are seeing poor performance with overseas users due to the serialized size of our object graphs using the default BinaryFormatter, which is exacerbated by the limited bandwidth in-between the client and server (1Mbit/s).

As a quick win, I thought I'd put together a proof of concept to see if there were any performance gains to be had by using protobuf-net instead, by implementing ISerializable. As I was testing I ran into an issue whereby object references weren't being maintained.

I've put together an example which repros the issue. I'm expecting that the object in the Dictionary (Items[1]) and the object B.A will be the same as I've specified AsReference=true in the ProtoMember attribute.

Using protobuf-net 2.0.0.619, I'm seeing an exception thrown when deserializing (A reference-tracked object changed reference during deserialization).

If this isn't a supported scenario the please let me know.

Test

[Test]
public void AreObjectReferencesSameAfterDeserialization()
{
    A a = new A();
    B b = new B();

    b.A = a;

    b.Items.Add(1, a);

    Assert.AreSame(a, b.A);
    Assert.AreSame(b.A, b.Items[1]);

    B deserializedB;

    using (var stream = new MemoryStream())
    {
        Serializer.Serialize(stream, b);
        stream.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin);
        deserializedB = Serializer.Deserialize<B>(stream);
    }

    Assert.AreSame(deserializedB.A, deserializedB.Items[1]);
}

Class definitions

[Serializable]
[ProtoContract]
public class A
{
}

[Serializable]
[ProtoContract]
public class B
{
    [ProtoMember(1, AsReference = true)]
    public A A { get; set; }

    [ProtoMember(2, AsReference = true)]
    public Dictionary<int, A> Items { get; set; }

    public B()
    {
        Items = new Dictionary<int, A>();
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
It looks like someone else had a similar issue: stackoverflow.com/questions/6923891/… Standard lists and dictionaries work fine; however, I have an outstanding change request to support AsReference inside a dictionary. Meaning, Dictionary<string, Foo> won't currently run the graph code for Foo, but I can probably find a few moments to look at this if it is causing you significant pain It would be very helpful to me if the graph code did run for Foo :) –  Lee F Jan 21 '13 at 15:48
    
Just as an update: I've had a stab at getting it working in a way that requires no fussing. I have one remaining glitch to iron out, where-by currently the behaviour depends on the order in which types are discovered (which is clearly very undesirable), which I need to iron out. –  Marc Gravell Jan 22 '13 at 22:09
    
Good stuff, it's nice to hear that you've been able to get something working so quickly. –  Lee F Jan 23 '13 at 9:11
    
The AsReferenceDefault optional attribute property on ProtoContract will be fully working from the next build –  Marc Gravell Apr 12 '13 at 19:18
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Edit: this should work from the next build onwards simply by marking the type's AsReferenceDefault:

[ProtoContract(AsReferenceDefault=true)]
public class A
{
    // ...
}

At the current time this is sort of an unsupported scenario - at least, via the attributes it is unsupported; basically, the AsReference=true currently is referring to the KeyValuePair<int,A>, which doesn't really make sense since KeyValuePair<int,A> is a value-type (so this can never be treated as a reference; I've added a better message for that in my local copy).

Because KeyValuePair<int,A> acts (by default) as a tuple, there is currently nowhere to support the AsReference information, but that is a scenario I would like to support better, and I will be investigating this.

There was also a bug that meant that AsReference on tuples (even reference-type tuples) was getting out-of-order, but I've fixed that locally; this was where the "changed" message came from.

In theory, the work for me to do this isn't huge; the fundamentals already work, and oddly enough it came up separately on twitter last night too - I guess "dictionary pointing to an object" is a very common scenario. At a guess, I imagince I'll add some atribute to help describe this situation, but you can actually hack around it at the moment using a couple of different routes:

1: configure KeyValuePair<int,A> manually:

[Test]
public void ExecuteHackedViaFields()
{
    // I'm using separate models **only** to keep them clean between tests;
    // normally you would use RuntimeTypeModel.Default
    var model = TypeModel.Create();

    // configure using the fields of KeyValuePair<int,A>
    var type = model.Add(typeof(KeyValuePair<int, A>), false);
    type.Add(1, "key");
    type.AddField(2, "value").AsReference = true;

     // or just remove AsReference on Items
    model[typeof(B)][2].AsReference = false;

    Execute(model);
}

I don't like this much, because it exploits implementation details of KeyValuePair<,> (the private fields), and may not work between .NET versions. I would prefer to replace KeyValuePair<,> on the fly via a surrogate:

[Test]
public void ExecuteHackedViaSurrogate()
{
    // I'm using separate models **only** to keep them clean between tests;
    // normally you would use RuntimeTypeModel.Default
    var model = TypeModel.Create();

    // or just remove AsReference on Items
    model[typeof(B)][2].AsReference = false;

    // this is the evil bit: configure a surrogate for KeyValuePair<int,A>
    model[typeof(KeyValuePair<int, A>)].SetSurrogate(typeof(RefPair<int, A>));
    Execute(model);
}

[ProtoContract]
public struct RefPair<TKey,TValue> {
    [ProtoMember(1)]
    public TKey Key {get; private set;}
    [ProtoMember(2, AsReference = true)]
    public TValue Value {get; private set;}
    public RefPair(TKey key, TValue value) : this() {
        Key = key;
        Value = value;
    }
    public static implicit operator KeyValuePair<TKey,TValue>
        (RefPair<TKey,TValue> val)
    {
        return new KeyValuePair<TKey,TValue>(val.Key, val.Value);
    }
    public static implicit operator RefPair<TKey,TValue>
        (KeyValuePair<TKey,TValue> val)
    {
        return new RefPair<TKey,TValue>(val.Key, val.Value);
    }
}

This configures something to use instead of KeyValuePair<int,A> (converted via the operators).

In both of these, Execute is just:

private void Execute(TypeModel model)
{
    A a = new A();
    B b = new B();

    b.A = a;

    b.Items.Add(1, a);

    Assert.AreSame(a, b.A);
    Assert.AreSame(b.A, b.Items[1]);

    B deserializedB = (B)model.DeepClone(b);

    Assert.AreSame(deserializedB.A, deserializedB.Items[1]);
}

I do, however, want to add direct support. The good thing about both of the above is that when I get time to do that, you just have to remove the custom configuration code.

For completeness, if your code is using Serializer.* methods, then rather than create / configure a new model, you should configure the default model:

RuntimeTypeModel.Default.Add(...); // etc

Serializer.* is basically a short-cut to RuntimeTypeModel.Default.*.

Finally: you should not create a new TypeModel per call; that would hurt prerformance. You should create and configure one model instance, and re-use it lots. Or just use the default model.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for that Marc, a very helpful and comprehensive answer. I've gone with the surrogate approach and it's working well, however as you say, I imagine this scenario is relatively common so it would be nice to see it supported out of the box without having to configure surrogates for each KVP. –  Lee F Jan 22 '13 at 10:31
    
@Lee indeed; another reason to do that is that "precompile" currently only works with attribute-based models: it doesn't execute any code in the inspected assembly. That restricts usage on "light" frameworks (WP7/WP8/iOS/etc). –  Marc Gravell Jan 22 '13 at 10:55
add comment

I've setup a small test and found out that the AsReferenceDefault attribute doesn't work quite as expected.

Test class:

[ProtoContract(AsReferenceDefault = true)]
public class TEST
{
    [ProtoMember(1018)]
    public List<TEST> _Items { get; set; }

    [ProtoMember(1001, AsReference = true)]
    public TEST Parent;

    [ProtoMember(1003)]
    public string NameItemType;

    public void AddItem(TEST Item)
    {
        _Items.Add(Item);
        Item.Parent = this;
    }

    public TEST()
    {
    }
}

Test code:

        TEST ci = new TEST(); ci._Items = new List<TEST>(); ci.NameItemType = "ROOT_ITEM";
        TEST ci_2 = new TEST(); ci_2._Items = new List<TEST>(); ci_2.NameItemType = "ITEM_02"; ci.AddItem(ci_2);
        TEST ci_3 = new TEST(); ci_3._Items = new List<TEST>(); ci_3.NameItemType = "ITEM_03"; ci_2.AddItem(ci_3);

        // --> Confirm references.
        bool AreEqual = false;
        if (ci == ci_2.Parent)
            AreEqual = true;
        if (ci_2 == ci_3.Parent)
            AreEqual = true;

        // --> Serialize.
        byte[] buf;
        using (System.IO.MemoryStream ms = new System.IO.MemoryStream())
        {
            ProtoBuf.Serializer.Serialize(ms, ci);
            buf = ms.ToArray();
        }

        // --> Deserialize.
        using (System.IO.MemoryStream ms = new System.IO.MemoryStream(buf))
        {
            ci = ProtoBuf.Serializer.Deserialize<TEST>(ms);
        }

        // --> Confirm references.
        ci_2 = ci._Items[0];  
        ci_3 = ci_2._Items[0];
        if (ci == ci_2.Parent)
            AreEqual = true;
        if (ci_2 == ci_3.Parent)  // HERE IS WHERE IT FAILS! 
                                  // THEY SHOULD BE EQUAL AFTER DESERIALIZATION!
            AreEqual = true;    
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.