Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I need to reduce the size of a set by combining the numbers in it. I need all possible combinations. Here are two examples that might illustrate my situation.

1) Set1 has 4 entries and Set2 has 2. So we need to combine two numbers in each case.

Set1 = {70, 100, 50, 200}; Set2 = {"part1", "part2"}
All combinations I want to retrive should look like following:
"part1"        |"part2"
  70 + 100       |  50 + 200
  70 + 50        | 100 + 200
  70 + 200       |  50 + 100
 100 + 50       |  70 + 200
 100 + 200      |  50 +  70
  50 + 200       | 100 +  70
 50             |  70 + 100 + 200
 70             |  50 + 100 + 200
 100            |  50 +  70 + 200
 200            |  50 +  70 + 100  
 70 + 100 + 200 |  50
 50 + 100 + 200 |  70
 50 +  70 + 200 |  100
 50 +  70 + 100 |  200 

2) Set1 has 4 entries and Set2 has 3. So we need to combine two numbers just once.

Set1 = {70, 100, 50, 200}; Set2 = {"part1", "part2", "part3"}
All combinations I want to retrive should look like following:
"part1"   |"part2"     |"part3"
   70        | 100        |  50 + 200
   70        |  50        | 100 + 200
   70        | 200        |  50 + 100
   50        |  70        | 100 + 200 
   50        | 100        |  70 + 200
   50        | 200        |  70 + 100
 100       |  70        |  50 + 200
 100       | 200        |  50 +  70
 100       |  50        | 200 +  70
 200       |  70        |  50 + 100
 200       | 100        |  50 +  70
 200       |  50        |  70 + 100
   70        |  50 + 200  |  100
   70        | 100 + 200  |   50
   70        |  50 + 100  |  200
   50        | 100 + 200  |   70
   50        | 200 + 70   |  100
   50        |  70 + 100  |  200
 100       |  50 + 200  |   70
 100       |  50 +  70  |  200
 100       | 200 +  70  |   50
 200       |  50 + 100  |   70
 200       |  50 +  70  |  100
 200       |  70 + 100  |   50 
   50 + 200  | 100        |  70
 100 + 200 |  50        |  70
   50 + 100  | 200        |  70
 100 + 200 |  70        |  50
   70 + 200  | 100        |  50
   70 + 100  | 200        |  50
   50 + 200  |  70         | 100
   50 +  70  | 200         | 100
 200 +  70 |  50         | 100
   50 + 100  |  70         | 200
   50 +  70  | 100         | 200
   70 + 100  |  50         | 200

I appreciate any help. I cannot think of any words to explain my concern better. But I will be very happy to answer any question. With you help I might be able to substantiate my question. Although the application is written in C# i don't necessarily need source code. My problem is rather the concept than the implementation.

THANKS in advance!

share|improve this question
    
So, given a set Set1, and another set Set2 of size s, you want to find all partitions of Set1 into s parts, where 1 the order of parts matters, 2 the order of elements within a part doesn't matter, 3 the number of elements in each part is nearly equal. – Rawling Jan 21 '13 at 12:21
    
Thank you very much for your effort so far @Rawling. Assumption 1 and 2 are right on. The number of elements in each part (3) do not have to be nearly equal. I rather want to get all possible combinations. Only empty partitions must be avoided. – Toby Jan 21 '13 at 13:27
    
OK; in that case you're missing 8 more lines in your first example :) – Rawling Jan 21 '13 at 13:29
    
Yes, you were right again! I added the missing possibilities. – Toby Jan 21 '13 at 13:44
    
You need some kind of sorting or possible output in any order? – Толя Jan 21 '13 at 13:56
up vote 0 down vote accepted

OK, so the general idea here is

  • Start off with {0, 0, 0, 0} - that's a zero for each element of Set1.
  • 0 represents the first item in Set2. Thus this first array is "everything in Set1 belongs to the first item in Set2".
  • Return a partition corresponding to this.
  • Increment {0, 0, 0, 0} to {0, 0, 0, 1}.
  • 1 represents the second item in Set2. Thus this array is "everything in Set1 belongs to the first item in Set2, except the last, which belongs to the second item in Set2".
  • Return a partition corresponding to this.
  • Increment {0, 0, 0, 1} to {0, 0, 1, 0} (or {0, 0, 0, 2} if you have more than 2 items in Set2).
  • Repeat until you hit {1, 1, 1, 1} (or {2, 2, 2, 2} etc.) and can't go any further.

You can then add logic saying "if a partition has any empty parts, don't bother with it".

I implemented this as follows:

static IEnumerable<ILookup<T, U>> Pool<T, U>(T[] t, U[] u)
{
    // Start off with all zeroes.
    int[] indices = new int[u.Length];

    while (true)
    {
        // Build a Lookup from the array.
        var lookup = (Lookup<T,U>)indices
            .Select((ti, ui) => new { U = u[ui], T = t[ti] })
            .ToLookup(p => p.T, p => p.U);
        // Only return it if every part is non-empty.
        if (lookup.Count == t.Length)
            yield return lookup;

        // Increment to the next value.
        int toIncrement = u.Length - 1;
        while (++indices[toIncrement] == t.Length)
        {
            indices[toIncrement] = 0;

            // Stop when we can't increment further.
            if (toIncrement-- == 0)
                yield break;
        }
    }
}

which you can call as

foreach (var q in Pool(
    new[] { "part1", "part2" },
    new[] { 70, 100, 50, 200 }))
{
    foreach (int i in q["part1"])
        Console.Write(i + " ");
    Console.Write("| ");
    foreach (var ii in q["part2"])
        Console.Write(ii + " ");
    Console.WriteLine();
}

Note I've made my parameters arrays because I'm lazy, but you could make them lists, or make them enumerables and call ToArray on them.

share|improve this answer
    
You nailed it @Rawling. Awesome work! – Toby Jan 22 '13 at 13:52
    
Unfortunately I realized, that trying all combinations is not possible in some cases since there are just to many. Set1 has often a count of more than 10 (up to 35). Set2 tends to have about 8 but can have up to 18 entries. @Rawling do you have an idea how to just calculate promising combis. E.g. only nearly balanced sets? My ultimate goal is to find a subset which is most similar to a given one. I define the similarity as the sum of the deviations at every position. See:Fitting func – Toby Jan 24 '13 at 9:51
    
@Toby This changes the scope of your question quite a bit - if I were you I'd ask it as a new question. Make sure to include some examples of "good" and "bad" results. – Rawling Jan 24 '13 at 9:54

The main difficulty in your problem is:

How to get all the subsets of a given set?

Here is my idea: I suppose your first set will not exceed 32 elements. Otherwise, the result will be quite huge.

Then, for a given set MySet = { a, b, c, d, e }, each subset of this set can be described with a value between 0 and 2^5 - 1.

How ?

Using the bits! OK for example, the number 5 (00101 binary) means, a and c are included in the subset.

So to have the entire collection of a subset of a given set of N elements. Just iterate from 0 to 2^N-1 excluded.

Then, how to create the other parts (except last one)?

Just get the complement of the first set and iterate on its subsets.

Then, the last part?

Get the complement of your previous parts!

It is possible not to have to look for the complement of the previous subset with this technique, but it requires some non-standard bitwise operations.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.