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I have this objects:

notes:[ 
     { user: {
           name: "A",
           group:{
                id:1,
                name:"Group 1"
           }
     }, 
     { user: {
           name: "B",
           group:{
                id:1,
                name:"Group 1"
           }
    }]

and I need to group it by group.. so I tried this:

foreach (IGrouping<Group, Note> item in notes.GroupBy(n => n.User.Group))
{
    var groupName = item.Key.Name;

    foreach (var note in item)
    {
        //
    }
}

But I got a problem because grouping is not working(I think it's because it uses references to group a complex type). If I change n.User.Group by n.User.GroupId it works, but if I do it I can't get the group name.

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1  
This comes down to how Group defines equality, specifically via int GetHashCode(), bool Equals(object), and (preferably) bool IEquatable<Group>.Equals(Group). –  Marc Gravell Jan 21 '13 at 13:13

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You need to override Equals and GetHashCode in Group class. R# generates this kind of code for it:

public class Group
{
    public int GroupId { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }

    protected bool Equals(Group other)
    {
        return GroupId == other.GroupId;
    }

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        if (ReferenceEquals(null, obj)) return false;
        if (ReferenceEquals(this, obj)) return true;
        if (obj.GetType() != this.GetType()) return false;
        return Equals((Group) obj);
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        return GroupId;
    }
}
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note: having equality based on something that is mutable during the object's life can be very dangerous. If the GroupId gets changed, data can become unfindable (in a dictionary, etc). But: for the deterministic life-cycle of GroupBy it should be fine. –  Marc Gravell Jan 21 '13 at 13:14
    
I guess Group is an entity here. So GroupId shouldn't really change (or it will cause a lot of other problems too). –  pkmiec Jan 21 '13 at 13:17

yes, this is correct. by default classes are all unique, however you can override the uniqueness.

  1. override Equals(object obj) & GetHasCode() on the group object to implement your own equality
  2. Implement IEqualityComparer<Group> and pass this as the 3rd argument to the GroupBy method.
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2  
"complex types are all unique" is a little misleading: that applies to classes, yes: but structs default to field-wise equality (although sub-optimal, note: always better to override it if using equality tests) –  Marc Gravell Jan 21 '13 at 13:16
    
thanks for pointing that out. I updated my answer to reflect this. –  Jason Meckley Jan 21 '13 at 14:49

You have several choices here:

  • Make sure the class of the group object implements GetHashCode and Equals. Implementing these could be as simple as comparing ids inside the groups
  • Group by id, and get the group name grom the group of the first user in the grouping. All grouped users belong to the same group, so the name will be the same
  • If you have no access to the source of your group class, group by a wrapper that implements GetHashCode and Equals based on the id of the group that it wraps.
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You take take the advantage of comparing anonymous classes and write as

notes.GroupBy(n => new{n.User.Group.ID,n.User.Group.Name});
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