Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following method, to convert a BitmapImage to a System.Drawing.Bitmap:

public static Bitmap BitmapImageToBitmap(BitmapImage bitmapImage)
{
    Bitmap bitmap;

    using (var ms = new MemoryStream())
    {
        var encoder = new JpegBitmapEncoder();
        encoder.Frames.Add(BitmapFrame.Create(bitmapImage));
        encoder.Save(ms);

        bitmap = new Bitmap(ms);
    }

    return bitmap;
}

Whenever I try and use the returned Bitmap object, I get the following error:

OutOfMemoryException occured - Out of memory.

However, whenever I replace the code with this:

public static Bitmap BitmapImageToBitmap(BitmapImage bitmapImage)
{
    var ms = new MemoryStream();

    var encoder = new JpegBitmapEncoder();
    encoder.Frames.Add(BitmapFrame.Create(bitmapImage));

    encoder.Save(ms);

    return new Bitmap(ms);
}

This works fine. However, I am pretty sure that I am supposed to use using as the MemoryStream object implements IDisposable. What's going on here?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Bitmap's constructor Bitmap Constructor (Stream) claims that

You must keep the stream open for the lifetime of the Bitmap.

In your case, when you're using using statement, stream (being Disposable) automatically disposed, so your Bitmap object becomes invalid. It's not about that you allocate too much memory, but about that bitmap point to -something that no longer exists.

share|improve this answer
1  
What's the recommended workaround? Creating a temp bitmap, copying it (with new Bitmap(temp) or temp.Clone()) and then disposing the temp? –  CodesInChaos Jan 21 '13 at 13:23
    
@CodesInChaos: it should be possible (not really sure on this) to avoid maintaining stream alive, if you clone bitmap into another instance and only after destroy a stream. –  Tigran Jan 21 '13 at 13:29

What @Tigran said was absolutely correct, and I implemented @CodesInChaos' workaround like so:

public static Bitmap BitmapImageToBitmap(BitmapImage bitmapImage)
{
    Bitmap bitmap;

    using (var ms = new MemoryStream())
    {
        var encoder = new JpegBitmapEncoder();
        encoder.Frames.Add(BitmapFrame.Create(bitmapImage));
        encoder.Save(ms);

        using (var localBitmap = new Bitmap(ms))
        {
            bitmap = localBitmap.Clone(new Rectangle(0, 0, localBitmap.Width, localBitmap.Height),
                   PixelFormat.Format32bppArgb);  
        }
    }

    return bitmap;
}
share|improve this answer
    
don't forget to dispose localBitmap –  CodesInChaos Jan 21 '13 at 13:29
    
Updated answer, thanks –  JMK Jan 21 '13 at 13:30
    
The jpeg part is weird. Why would you save as jpeg and then load it again? only effect of that is reducing the quality. Use a lossless format, such as .bmp as serialization format. –  CodesInChaos Jan 21 '13 at 13:37
    
I'm working in WPF, and I need to use Aforge, so I think I need to convert to a Bitmap object, do what I need to do with Aforge, and then convert back, should I not do that? Also I actually am working with a BMP file, but I have found that the JpegBitmapEncoder works too, as do a few of the other encoders, and some are faster than others so I am trying out each one to see which gives me the best performance –  JMK Jan 21 '13 at 13:39
1  
Surprising that bitmap encoding would be slower. Bitmap encoding shouldn't be much more than a memcopy. And yes, I'd worry about the quality loss due to the jpeg encoding. –  CodesInChaos Jan 21 '13 at 14:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.