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I have a file named "ips" containing all ips I need to ping. In order to ping those IPs, I use the following code:

cat ips|xargs ping -c 2

but the console show me the usage of ping, I don't know how to do it correctly. I'm using Mac os

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it works in my ubuntu 12.04 –  arutaku Jan 21 '13 at 13:33
    
@arutaku, I'm using Mac OS –  user1687717 Jan 21 '13 at 13:34
    
So don't use "linux" tag then. –  Jens Erat Jan 21 '13 at 13:36

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You need to use the option -n1 with xargs to pass one IP at time as ping doesn't support multiple IPs:

$ cat ips | xargs -n1 ping -c 2

Demo:

$ cat ips
127.0.0.1
google.com
bbc.co.uk

$ cat ips | xargs echo ping -c 2
ping -c 2 127.0.0.1 google.com bbc.co.uk

$ cat ips | xargs -n1 echo ping -c 2
ping -c 2 127.0.0.1
ping -c 2 google.com
ping -c 2 bbc.co.uk

# Drop the UUOC and redirect the input
$ xargs -n1 echo ping -c 2 < ips
ping -c 2 127.0.0.1
ping -c 2 google.com
ping -c 2 bbc.co.uk
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1  
you are absolute right, thank you –  user1687717 Jan 21 '13 at 13:47

With ip or hostname in each line of ips file:

( while read ip; do ping -c 2 $ip; done ) < ips

You can also change timeout, with -W flag, so if some hosts isn'up, it wont lock your script for too much time. Also -q for quiet output is useful in this case.

( while read ip; do ping -c1 -W1 -q $ip; done ) < ips
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If the file is 1 ip per line (and it's not overly large), you can do it with a for loop:

for ip in $(cat ips); do
  ping -c 2 $ip;
done
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Try doing this :

cat ips | xargs -i% ping -c 2 %
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