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I have a list of ID numbers provided by a third party. for the moment lets assume that the numbers are not in any order or incremental algorithm. How can i safely allocate a number upon request when there is a possibility of multiple people attempting the same thing at the same time? everything i have thought of i can also come up with a condition where it would fail.

I am using c# and sql server for this.

EG: add numbers to a table with an auto generated identity column, then match that identity to a table with the list of id numbers - no good because there exists the possibility of the need for reallocation of an id number, and the identity column may get out of sync with the id table for whatever reason.

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why are you using a 3rd party vendor to provide you ID's in your environment? for starters if you have a Sql Server that holds these values and your data gets out of Sync, perhaps you could implement some sort of realtime replication system. or better yet use something like Active Directory. AD also has SID and the ability to use GUIDS. you could also implement your own GUID that keeps users identity / id's unique. could you give a better example of how the existing system works and what it's used for..? sounds like you may be approaching a very simple thing from a complex standpoint –  MethodMan Jan 21 '13 at 13:43
    
it id not a user id. we need to take our product and assign a id number to it based on the list provided by the other company. They are a subcontractor. –  gashach Jan 21 '13 at 13:54
    
the ` auto generated identity column` is fine but you could add 1 or 2 extra columns to insure uniqueness –  MethodMan Jan 21 '13 at 14:00
    
Is "the list" already a table in your database? If so, can you make changes to it (e.g. add columns to indicate whether a value is already in use and how)? –  Aaron Bertrand Jan 21 '13 at 14:07
    
take a look at this stackoverflow post stackoverflow.com/questions/2267165/… it may give you some better idea's on where to start in regards to using the Database to do the work of creating Unique Id's for you instead of doing it in code.. –  MethodMan Jan 21 '13 at 14:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I've always seen it done similar to this: Generate the ID first (probably guid), mark your record (locks the table so you can handle multiple simultaneous requests), then pull the data.

DECLARE @ID UniqueIdentifier

SET @ID = NEWID()

--ProductTable contains third party ID information
UPDATE TOP(1) ProductTable
    SET Assigned = 1,
        ID = @ID
WHERE Assigned <> 1

SELECT 
    ThirdPartyID
FROM ProductTable 
WHERE ID = @ID

You could also generate your guid in C# if you don't want to do that in SQL

Here is an easier way with which you could use an identity column instead of a GUID, as Bertrand noted it would be a smaller storage cost. This one assumes that you have loaded the third party numbers into a table with ID as an identity column

DECLARE @ID INT

UPDATE TOP(1) ProductTable
    SET Assigned = 1,
        @ID = ID
WHERE Assigned <> 1

SELECT 
    ThirdPartyID
FROM ProductTable 
WHERE ID = @ID
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Seems like the OP needs to match a number that already exists in some table somewhere, so just generating a GUID first doesn't work because the OP is not using GUIDs. –  Aaron Bertrand Jan 21 '13 at 14:09
    
Perhaps a further explanation is needed, I was imaging a scenario where the data from the 3rd party was stored in the ProductTable with an empty ID field, and then when paired with an ID in his system it was marked accordingly so not to be assigned twice –  msmucker0527 Jan 21 '13 at 14:11
    
But you could do that same thing with just an identity column elsewhere instead of a much wider GUID... –  Aaron Bertrand Jan 21 '13 at 14:16
    
this sounds like it will work perfectly....the table can be setup so there are three columns .thirparty ID, My ID. if myID is blank, then it is a free item. –  gashach Jan 21 '13 at 14:18
    
i think i may wrap that in an application lock because i also need to be able to prevent 2 people from adding the same internal ID at the same time. –  gashach Jan 21 '13 at 14:22

Well if I get you the simplest approach, a Table ThirdPartyID (PK) UserID (FK) (or session ?) TimeAllocated DateTime Then stored procs to allocate and deallocate

Use the Time column to look for ones that have been allocated longer than is sensible due to some failure. If you are using sessions and you are happy to release the 3rd party Id on it being deleted then a cascade when you tidy up dead sessions would do the job instead.

Making this fool prooof as in it will never fail can get very expensive, in fact given a finite list of IDs, you could run out, so not possible at all.

Think to work one is you don't habnd out more than one id to a user, or an id to more than one user. You could in theory get a key violation but a retry should sort that in almost all circumstances. Start simple, see what happens.

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