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I'm trying to find settings for compression level in Apache Commons Compress lib for tar and gzip archive types.

Could you please tell is it supported by the library? If yes, how can I configure it?

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2 Answers 2

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You can't.

First, tar does not compress at all; it's simply an archive format.

Second, gzip uses a single compression type, deflate. Compression schemes that allow "levels" uses those levels to select between algorithms (or, in the case of lossy compression, how much information to discard).

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You are right that the "Apache Commons Compress" library doesn't support it, but the same compression algorithm can often be run with different parameters (block size, dictionary size, etc) and achieve worse or better compression ratios at a cost of computational complexity. GNU's gzip tool does this and testing on an arbitrary text file, comparing -1 (fastest/worst) to -9 (slowest/best) gives a 50% larger file in about half the time. –  jarnbjo Jan 21 '13 at 14:16

tar is not a compressed format on its own, it just bundles multiple files into a single one (hence the name, the files stick together just like they were covered in tar).

You cannot change the compression level, if you need better compression, use bzip2 instead of gzip.

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The name "tar" is an abbreviation of "tape archive". –  jarnbjo Jan 21 '13 at 14:11
    
@jarnbjo I'm pretty sure many possible names were debated and tar was chosen both because it's an acronym for tape archiver and also because it's catchy and has the picture of files being glued together. –  us2012 Jan 21 '13 at 14:15

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