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While experimenting with aggregate for another question here, I encountered a rather strange result. I'm unable to figure out why and am wondering if what I'm doing is totally wrong.

Suppose, I have a data.frame like this:

df <- structure(list(V1 = c(1L, 2L, 1L, 2L, 3L, 1L), 
                     V2 = c(2L, 3L, 2L, 3L, 4L, 2L), 
                     V3 = c(3L, 4L, 3L, 4L, 5L, 3L), 
                     V4 = c(4L, 5L, 4L, 5L, 6L, 4L)), 
                  .Names = c("V1", "V2", "V3", "V4"), 
        row.names = c(NA, -6L), class = "data.frame")
> df
#   V1 V2 V3 V4
# 1  1  2  3  4
# 2  2  3  4  5
# 3  1  2  3  4
# 4  2  3  4  5
# 5  3  4  5  6
# 6  1  2  3  4

Now, if I want to output a data.frame with unique rows with an additional column indicating their frequency in df. For this example,

#   V1 V2 V3 V4 x
# 1  1  2  3  4 3
# 2  2  3  4  5 2
# 3  3  4  5  6 1

I obtained this output using aggregate by experimenting as follows:

> aggregate(do.call(paste, df), by=df, print)

# [1] "1 2 3 4" "1 2 3 4" "1 2 3 4"
# [1] "2 3 4 5" "2 3 4 5"
# [1] "3 4 5 6"
#   V1 V2 V3 V4                         x
# 1  1  2  3  4 1 2 3 4, 1 2 3 4, 1 2 3 4
# 2  2  3  4  5          2 3 4 5, 2 3 4 5
# 3  3  4  5  6                   3 4 5 6

So, this gave me the pasted string. So, if I were to use length instead of print, it should give me the number of such occurrences, which is the desired result, which was the case (as shown below).

> aggregate(do.call(paste, df), by=df, length)
#   V1 V2 V3 V4 x
# 1  1  2  3  4 3
# 2  2  3  4  5 2
# 3  3  4  5  6 1

And this seemed to work. However, when the data.frame dimensions are 4*2500, the output data.frame is 1*2501 instead of 4*2501 (all rows are unique, so the frequency is 1).

> df <- as.data.frame(matrix(sample(1:3, 1e4, replace = TRUE), nrow=4))
> o <- aggregate(do.call(paste, df), by=df, length)
> dim(o)
# [1]    1 2501

I tested with smaller data.frames with just unique rows and it gives the right output (change nrow=40, for example). However, when the dimensions of the matrix increase, this doesn't seem to work. And I just can't figure out what's going wrong! Any ideas?

share|improve this question
2  
Maybe, because strings get too long and as.character inserts linebreaks? –  Roland Jan 21 '13 at 14:10
    
@Roland, You are right. I just read as.character Note section and it seems the line-break is at 500 characters. Is there any way to circumvent it? –  Arun Jan 21 '13 at 14:14
    
yes, as an alternative you could do aggregate(rep(1, nrow(df)), df, FUN = length). –  flodel Jan 21 '13 at 14:15
    
@flodel, doesn't seem to work. –  Arun Jan 21 '13 at 14:17
1  
This is nothing to do with as.character() as each of it's arguments is a length 1 vector. To see that this part works, just do do.call(paste, df[1:3, ]). –  Gavin Simpson Jan 21 '13 at 14:26

1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The issue here is how aggregate.data.frame() determines the groups.

In aggregate.data.frame() there is a loop which forms the grouping variable grp. In that loop, grp is altered/updated via:

grp <- grp * nlevels(ind) + (as.integer(ind) - 1L)

The problem with your example if that once by is converted to factors, and the loop has gone over all of these factors, in your example grp ends up being:

Browse[2]> grp
[1] Inf Inf Inf Inf

Essentially the looping update pushed the values of grp to a number indistinguishable from Inf.

Having done that, aggregate.data.frame() later does this

y <- y[match(sort(unique(grp)), grp, 0L), , drop = FALSE]

and this is where the earlier problem now manifests itself as

dim(y[match(sort(unique(grp)), grp, 0L), , drop = FALSE])

because

match(sort(unique(grp)), grp, 0L)

clearly returns just 1:

> match(sort(unique(grp)), grp, 0L)
[1] 1

as there is only one unique value of grp.

share|improve this answer
1  
There are just too many groups formed by by. I don't recommend you do this but another way to see the issue is to form the sub-data frames that aggregate would work on it the grp didn't go to Inf: length(split(do.call(paste, df), df)). WARNING that will some consume all your RAM (on my 4GB laptop I was quickly thrashing swap space). –  Gavin Simpson Jan 21 '13 at 14:35
1  
(+1) brilliant! I just ran the function step by step and was able to reproduce what you mention. –  Arun Jan 21 '13 at 14:39
1  
@Arun yep, debugonce() is your friend for this sort of thing. –  Gavin Simpson Jan 21 '13 at 14:40
    
I also see that the numbers generated for grp seems to increase quite rapidly. They are already 10 digits after 20 iterations! Thanks for debugonce(). I'll remember that for the next time. –  Arun Jan 21 '13 at 14:42

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