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I have a table products with 3 columns:
- id_product
- quantity_in_stock
- product_name

I want to have all the rows ORDERED BY product_name with quantity_in_stock at the bottom of my result if it's = 0.

I tried this query but it doesn't work:

(SELECT * 
FROM products 
WHERE quantity_in_stock != 0
ORDER BY product_name ASC)
UNION
(SELECT * 
FROM products 
WHERE quantity_in_stock = 0
ORDER BY product_name ASC)

Maybe there is a simpler way to do that but it's monday! ;)

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ORDER BY quantity_in_stock = 0? –  Strawberry Jan 21 '13 at 13:50
    
Sorry, I changed now my question: I want it ordered by product_name. With that query I actually can separate products by quantity_in_stock but they don't show ordered by product_name! –  alessandroweb Jan 21 '13 at 13:52
    
Come on. See if you can figure out how to fix that yourself. Or just wait six seconds and have it all handed to you on a plate. –  Strawberry Jan 21 '13 at 13:55

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The ORDER BY can contain an arbitrary expression, so you can evaluate those which = 0 and assign them a higher value which sorts later:

SELECT * 
FROM products
ORDER BY 
  /* If quantity_in_stock is 0, assign a 1 otherwise 0. The ones sort after 0 */
  CASE WHEN quantity_in_stock = 0 THEN 1 ELSE 0 END ASC,
  /* Then sub-order by name */
  product_name ASC

Because of MySQL's boolean evaluation returning 1 or 0, you can simplify this as below. It won't work in every RDBMS though:

SELECT * 
FROM products
ORDER BY
  /* Will return 0 (false) for quantity_in_stock <> 0 and 1 if true */
  (quantity_in_stock = 0) ASC,
  product_name ASC

Beware though, if quantity_in_stock is not indexed, query performance could be affected negatively by this.

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1  
or you can order by ABS(SIGN(quantity_in_stock)) in this case –  valex Jan 21 '13 at 13:59
    
@valex Yes that would be clever and portable. –  Michael Berkowski Jan 21 '13 at 14:00
    
@MichaelBerkowski The second query works like a charm. –  alessandroweb Jan 21 '13 at 14:03
1  
@alessandroweb The best way is to use the first one with CASE. –  valex Jan 21 '13 at 14:16
1  
@AndroidKiller No, it isn't mandatory to use ASC. Good to be explicit though. Just noticed I was missing an END keyword on the CASE. –  Michael Berkowski Jan 21 '13 at 14:30

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