Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to compile a Go program made up of multiple modules, like so:

// main.go
package main
import "mst"
// do something interesting involving minimum spanning trees

// src/mst/kruskal.go
import "disjsets"
// Kruskal's algorithm follows

// src/disjsets/disjsets.go
// implements disjoint sets with union-find

Now, when I run either go run main.go or go build after export GOPATH=. in the directory containing both main.go and src, it prints

# disjsets
open src/disjsets/disjsets.go: No such file or directory

I don't get this. The file is there as ls -l src/disjsets/disjsets.go confirms. How can this happen? Where should the disjsets.go file live if Go is to find it?

(Google Go 1.0.2)

share|improve this question
1  
You should probably change your question topic, the compiler doesn't 'lie' so the answer to your question is there, it means "no such file or directory" Your question is not what it means by that, it's why it's saying that (if a file exists) –  Lee Jarvis Jan 21 '13 at 14:10
    
Where are you doing export GOPATH=.? –  zzzz Jan 21 '13 at 14:13
    
@jnml: in the directory containing main.go and src. –  larsmans Jan 21 '13 at 14:14
2  
Exactly like in the joke about that lost helicopter flying around M$ headquarters :-( –  zzzz Jan 21 '13 at 14:16
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I believe you should read, or re-read How to Write Go code

In short:

Set you GOPATH to somewhere and export it for good. Then put some package blah into directory

$GOPATH/src/foo/bar/baz/blah # (1)

or

$GOPATH/src/blah # (2)

or

$GOPATH/src/qux/blah # (3) etc.

Import blah into other packages as

import "foo/bar/baz/blah" // (1)

or

import "blah" // (2)

or

import "qux/blah" // (3)

The package in that directory will contain the package files. Say you have only one, blah.go. Then its location would be

$GOPATH/src/foo/bar/baz/blah/blah.go // (1)

$GOPATH/src/blah/blah.go // (2)

$GOPATH/src/qux/blah/blah.go // (3)

If the blah package source file is named, say proj.go instead, then

$GOPATH/src/foo/bar/baz/blah/proj.go // (1)

$GOPATH/src/blah/proj.go // (2)

$GOPATH/src/qux/blah/proj.go // (3)

But the import paths would be the same as in the previous case.

share|improve this answer
    
Good answer. +1 –  weberc2 Jan 23 '13 at 15:43
    
Consider mentioning that the export GOPATH=... should occur in ~/.bashrc or ~/.profile or some such so it isn't specific to a certain shell. –  weberc2 Jan 23 '13 at 15:44
add comment

Ok, this seems to solve it:

export GOPATH=`pwd`

Apparently, it needs to be an absolute path. I still find the error message very confusing, though.

share|improve this answer
2  
I would recommend to add to your favorite shell configuration file, for example, export GOPATH=$HOME and then write your code for package 'foo/blah' in ~/src/foo/blah/whatever.go. Switching GOPATH to pwd may make sense, but probably only in situations other than where you are now. IOW, the pwd hack is IMO not a good idea. Probably even more if this are someone's first steps with Go. –  zzzz Jan 21 '13 at 14:48
    
@jnml: I am still learning the language and the tools -- but having my code organised per language instead of per project is not how I like to work. Maybe I should change habits, I'll see. –  larsmans Jan 21 '13 at 15:52
    
I have all of the different language projects bellow ~/src. The subtree path is either the public repository path (like eg.~/src/github.com/nick/prj-in-lang-x) and for company stuff I use eg. ~/src/gitlab.ourdomain.com/proj-in-lang-y, which is essentially the same schema. This way all of the languages live together in peace on my disk ;-) –  zzzz Jan 21 '13 at 16:09
    
I also like to separate my code by language. I have a directory ~/Projects containing subdirs Go, Java, C++, Vala, etc. I simply set my GOPATH env variable to $HOME/Projects/Go and my Go directory contains src, pkg, and bin subdirectories, as would be expected in a Go workspace. This allows me to have a fixed GOPATH and organize my code by languages without the pwd hack. –  weberc2 Jan 23 '13 at 15:42
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.