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I've a xml file, and I'm trying to add additional element to it. the xml has the next structure :

<root>
  <OldNode/>
</root>

What I'm looking for is :

<root>
  <OldNode/>
  <NewNode/>
</root>

but actually I'm getting next xml :

<root>
  <OldNode/>
</root>

<root>
  <OldNode/>
  <NewNode/>
</root>

My code looks like that :

file = open("/tmp/" + executionID +".xml", 'a')
xmlRoot = xml.parse("/tmp/" + executionID +".xml").getroot()

child = xml.Element("NewNode")
xmlRoot.append(child)

xml.ElementTree(root).write(file)

file.close()

Thanks.

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1 Answer 1

You opened the file for appending, which adds data to the end. Open the file for writing instead, using the w mode. Better still, just use the .write() method on the ElementTree object:

tree = xml.parse("/tmp/" + executionID +".xml")

xmlRoot = tree.getroot()
child = xml.Element("NewNode")
xmlRoot.append(child)

tree.write("/tmp/" + executionID +".xml")

Using the .write() method has the added advantage that you can set the encoding, force the XML prolog to be written if you need it, etc.

If you must use an open file to prettify the XML, use the 'w' mode, 'a' opens a file for appending, leading to the behaviour you observed:

with open("/tmp/" + executionID +".xml", 'w') as output:
     output.write(prettify(tree))

where prettify is something along the lines of:

from xml.etree import ElementTree
from xml.dom import minidom

def prettify(elem):
    """Return a pretty-printed XML string for the Element.
    """
    rough_string = ElementTree.tostring(elem, 'utf-8')
    reparsed = minidom.parseString(rough_string)
    return reparsed.toprettyxml(indent="  ")

e.g. the minidom prettifying trick.

share|improve this answer
    
xmlRoot is an ElementTree.Element, not the tree itself, so it doesn't have the write method. The OP could use tree = xml.ElementTree(xmlRoot); tree.write(...) however... (Or better yet, save the tree returned by xml.parse). –  unutbu Jan 21 '13 at 14:18
    
@unutbu: indeed, the tree itself was being ignored. Updated (simply enough). –  Martijn Pieters Jan 21 '13 at 14:23
    
When I'm opening the file in 'w' mode, all the previous data has been destroyed and then I'm getting an exception... –  Igal Jan 21 '13 at 14:23
    
@user301639: Perhaps you made an error in your code then; what is the exception you get? If you replaced the 'a' in your code with 'w' the only difference you'll have is that you don't append but overwrite the data; if it works with 'a' it works with 'w'. –  Martijn Pieters Jan 21 '13 at 14:24
    
+1 for tree.write. –  unutbu Jan 21 '13 at 14:27

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