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not exp log srand xor s qq qx xor
s x x length uc ord and print chr
ord for qw q join use sub tied qx
xor eval xor print qq q q xor int
eval lc q m cos and print chr ord
for qw y abs ne open tied hex exp
ref y m xor scalar srand print qq
q q xor int eval lc qq y sqrt cos
and print chr ord for qw x printf
each return local x y or print qq
s s and eval q s undef or oct xor
time xor ref print chr int ord lc
foreach qw y hex alarm chdir kill
exec return y s gt sin sort split

Like any other JAPH, this prints out "just another perl hacker". But I'd like a semi-detailed dissection of what behavior this particular JAPH is taking advantage of to work - I'm no good at Perl, but some JAPHs I can read through... this, no way.

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10  
Always start with: perldoc.perl.org/B/Deparse.html –  toolic Jan 21 '13 at 14:22
6  
perlmonks.org/?node_id=290623 –  toolic Jan 21 '13 at 14:26
1  
@toolic Ah, shoulda checked the Dojo - the perl monks solved it again –  PinkElephantsOnParade Jan 21 '13 at 14:28
1  
It is disappointing, but not surprising, that vim-perl syntax highlighting does not highlight that correctly. –  Andy Lester Jan 21 '13 at 15:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

It's really not that hard once you understood the basics. Here are some hints to get you started:

not exp log srand
        # srand = 1, exp o log = id, not 1 = 0

        # $_ = undef
xor s// /x                      
        # $_ = ' '
xor s/ / length uc ord and print chr ord for qw q join use sub tied q/
        # $_ = ' length uc ord and print chr ord for qw q join use sub tied q'

xor eval

Note that chr ord of a string returns the first character and join use sub tied in the end has the first characters j, u, s, t. :)

Just for fun, I wrote an extension of this famous japhs years ago:

not srand xor s qq qx xor s x x length uc
ord and print uc chr ord for qw q join qx
xor eval xor lc eval qq x abs cos ord and
print chr ord for qw q use substr tied qx
xor print qq q q xor int eval lc qq m cos
and print chr ord for qw y abs ne or tied
hex exp ref y m xor scalar srand print qq
q q xor sin abs eval q x log srand ord or
printf uc chr ord foreach qw q package qx
xor sqrt eval lc qq y sqrt cos and printf
chr ord for qw x each return local x y or
print qq s s and uc exp eval q s undef or
oct xor time xor ref print chr int ord lc
for qw y hex alarm chdir kill exec return
y s xor log exp eval q x print chr length
join qw y length for map substr chr shift
y x or sqrt abs ord lc and eval print q q
q and s q q lcfirst chr eval log shift qx

printing the real string "Just another Perl hacker,\n".

And this is a smaller version containing a german christmas greeting:

not exp log srand xor s qq qx xor
s x x length uc ord and print chr
ord for qw q find redo ord helpme
eval scalar qx xor eval xor print
q q q xor int eval lc q m cos and
print chr ord for qw y flock each
s tell y m gt sin ref study split
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Ahhh - the hint revealed it. I see now, heh. –  PinkElephantsOnParade Jan 21 '13 at 14:54

The first appearance of this JAPH appears to be on http://www.perlmonks.org/?node_id=290607

As the PerlMonks thread states, now there is an automatic tool which does this kind of obfuscation: http://namazu.org/~takesako/ppencode/

You can read it's source code, but reverse engineering is so much funnier :)

For instance, here's the code to print a whitespace:

stas@bp0907:~$ perl -e 'length q chmod lc and print chr ord q q eq'
 stas@bp0907:~$ 

Is this the only way of printing a ' ' character? Actually, no, refreshing produces:

stas@bp0907:~$ perl -e 'oct oct hex ord q else and print chr ord q q q'
 stas@bp0907:~$ 

Cool, both variants end on the same and print chr ord q q .... So everything before that must evaluate to true value and is there only to dust our eyes.

Then, print chr ord can be simplified to simply print in that context, as chr(ord($str)) only picks the first character from $str. So it boils down to:

stas@bp0907:~$ perl -e 'print q q eq'
 stas@bp0907:~$ 

q q eq is an unusual representation of the q quote, it is more easily recognized as q ( e). The same logic works for the original, even more obfuscated JAPH: print chr ord for qw y ... y will pick everything between y characters and separated by whitespaces as an array.


There is a related topic, which concerns Perl code shaped as an ASCII art. There is a CPAN module for that, too: Acme::EyeDrops

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