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I wrote a simple test program using thread locks. This program does not behave as expected, and the python interpreter does not complain.

test1.py:

from __future__ import with_statement
from threading import Thread, RLock
import time
import test2

lock = RLock()

class Test1(object):
    def __init__(self):
        print("Start Test1")
        self.test2 = test2.Test2()
        self.__Thread = Thread(target=self.myThread, name="thread")
        self.__Thread.daemon = True
        self.__Thread.start()
        self.test1Method()

    def test1Method(self):
        print("start test1Method")
        with lock:
            print("entered test1Method")
            time.sleep(5)
            print("end test1Method")

    def myThread(self):
        self.test2.test2Method()

if __name__ == "__main__":
    client = Test1()
    raw_input()

test2.py:

from __future__ import with_statement
import time
import test1

lock = test1.lock

class Test2(object):
    def __init__(self):
        print("Start Test2")

    def test2Method(self):
        print("start test2Method")
        with lock:
            print("entered test2Method")
            time.sleep(5)
            print("end test2Method")

Both sleeps are executed at the same time! Not what I expected when using the lock.

When test2Method is moved to test1.py everything works fine. When I create the lock in test2.py and import it in test1.py everything works fine. When I create the lock in a separate source file and import it both in test1.py and test2.py everything works fine.

Probably it has to do with circulair imports.

But why doesn't python complain about this?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

In Python when you execute a python script using $ python test1.py what happen is that your test1.py will be imported as __main__ instead of test1, so if you want to get the lock defined in the launched script you shouldn't import test1 but you should import __main__ because if you do the first one you will create another lock that is different from the __main__.lock (test1.lock != __main__.lock).

So one fix to your problem (which far from being the best) and to see what is happening you can change your 2 script to this:

test1.py:

from __future__ import with_statement
from threading import Thread, RLock
import time

lock = RLock()

class Test1(object):
    def __init__(self):
        print("Start Test1")
        import test2    # <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< Import is done here to be able to refer to __main__.lock.
        self.test2 = test2.Test2()
        self.__Thread = Thread(target=self.myThread, name="thread")
        self.__Thread.daemon = True
        self.__Thread.start()
        self.test1Method()

    def test1Method(self):
        print("start test1Method")
        with lock:
            print("entered test1Method")
            time.sleep(5)
            print("end test1Method")

    def myThread(self):
        self.test2.test2Method()

if __name__ == "__main__":
    client = Test1()
    raw_input()

test2.py:

from __future__ import with_statement
import time
# <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< test1 is changed to __main__ to get the same lock as the one used in the launched script.
import __main__

lock = __main__.lock

class Test2(object):
    def __init__(self):
        print("Start Test2")

    def test2Method(self):
        print("start test2Method")
        with lock:
            print("entered test2Method")
            time.sleep(5)
            print("end test2Method")

HTH,

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for explaining. Python is fairly new to me, I never came across this behavior. I am glad I asked, because it may occur in other, non threading, situations as well. –  user1997293 Jan 21 '13 at 16:06
    
@user1997293: Yes you are right this behavior is very common and glad my answer was helpful :) –  mouad Jan 21 '13 at 16:19

Using print statements before and after the import statements and printing id(lock) right after it's been created reveals that there are in fact two locks being created. It seems the module is imported twice, and mouad explains in his answer that this is because test1.py is imported first as __main__ and then as test1, which causes the lock to be instantiated twice.

Be that as it may, using a global lock is not a good solution anyway. There are several better solutions, and I think you'll find one of them will suit your needs.

  • Instantiate the lock as a class variable of Test1, and pass it as an argument to Test2

  • Instantiate the lock as a normal variable of Test1 in __init__, and pass it as an argument to Test2.

  • Instantiate the lock in the if __name__ == "__main__" block and pass it to Test1, and then from Test1 to Test2.

  • Instantiate the lock in the if __name__ == "__main__" block and first instantiate Test2 with the lock, then pass the Test2 instance and the lock to Test1. (This is the most decoupled way of doing it, and I'd recommend going with this method. It will ease unit testing, at the very least.).

Here's the code for the last suggestion:

test1.py:

class Test1(object):
    def __init__(self, lock, test2):
        print("Start Test1")
        self.lock = lock
        self.test2 = test2
        self.__Thread = Thread(target=self.myThread, name="thread")
        self.__Thread.daemon = True
        self.__Thread.start()
        self.test1Method()

    def test1Method(self):
        print("start test1Method")
        with self.lock:
            print("entered test1Method")
            time.sleep(1)
            print("end test1Method")

    def myThread(self):
        self.test2.test2Method()

if __name__ == "__main__":
    lock = RLock()
    test2 = test2.Test2(lock)
    client = Test1(lock, test2)

test2.py:

class Test2(object):
    def __init__(self, lock):
        self.lock = lock
        print("Start Test2")

    def test2Method(self):
        print("start test2Method")
        with self.lock:
            print("entered test2Method")
            time.sleep(1)
            print("end test2Method")
share|improve this answer

As others said, the problem is not in the threading, but in your special case of cyclic imports.

Why special? Because usual workflow (mod1 imports mod2 and mod2 imports mod1) looks like the next:

  1. You want to use module mod1, you imports it (import mod1)

  2. When Python finds it, interpreter adds it to sys.modules and starts code execution

  3. When it reaches line with import mod2, it stops execution of mod1 and starts execution of mod2

  4. When interpreter reaches import mod1 within mod2, it doesn't load mod1 because it was already added to sys.modules

  5. After that (unless some code in mod2 accesses some uninitialized resource from mod1) interpreter finishes execution of mod2 and mod1.

But in your case at step 4. Python executes test1 one more time because there is no test1 in sys.modules! The reason for this is that you didn't imported it in the first place, but run it from a command line.

So, just don't use cyclic imports - as you see it is a real mess.

share|improve this answer
    
Indeed I normally avoid cyclic imports. This time it was a small test program initially intended to see if lock would behave like a singleton, which it did not. This first test did not have cyclic imports. Then I changed the program a little to something that would work, but alas. –  user1997293 Jan 21 '13 at 16:12

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