Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a function where I update a structure, and also disable interrupts.

bool readBuffer()
{
    __disable_irq();

    rb->reader += 1; // Just an example

    __enable_irq();

    return true;
}

Because interrupts are disabled, its not possible that another interrupt pre-empts while im updating the values in the structure.

But should I also mark the reader variabele as volatile? Since in theory the other interrupt could pre-empt while I enter the function, but just before __disable_irq() is actually called. And when my function resumes, the cached value of rb->reader will be incorrect. Or does the compiler (GCC) generate code that does not cache rb->reader untill that line is actually hit?

share|improve this question
3  
Perhaps refer to volatile considered harmful by Linus Torvalds. Does __disable_irq() acts as an implicit memory barrier? If yes, then you don't need volatile and using it can only hurt. –  Celada Jan 21 '13 at 16:51

1 Answer 1

May be it will be better for you to specify explicit optimization barrier:

bool readBuffer()
{
    __disable_irq();
    asm volatile ("" ::: "memory"); // Some unexpected memory modification
    rb->reader += 1; // Just an example
    __enable_irq();
    return true;
}

It will be profitable if in some other cases you want compiler to optimize rb->reader variable, and marking it volatile will be thus excessive.

share|improve this answer
    
What you have suggested seems to be an optimization barrier right ? Memory barriers are slightly different. Maybe you could prefix a 'lock' instruction in the asm section i.e. 'asm volatile("lock; addl $0, 0(%%esp)":::"memory") . What Joshua needs is a memory barrier but what you have suggested seems more like an optimization barrier which is hinting to the compiler not to rely on values from registers that were populated by code sections before the 'asm'. This does not guarantee that the 'rb->reader += 1' would only be executed after __disable_irq(). –  Anoop Menon Jan 22 '13 at 7:39
    
I think, volatile then is optimization barrier too, not memory one. Thanks for correcting my terminology, edited post. But I suppose, that optimization barrier here is enough, because Joshua worrying more about optimizing out value of rb->reader, that will be impossible in that case. –  Konstantin Vladimirov Jan 22 '13 at 7:52

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.