Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Today i received email from my hosting account saying that i need to tweak my query:

SELECT
  `id`, `nick`, `msg`, `uid`, `show_pic`,
  `time`,`ip`,`time_updated`,
  (SELECT COUNT(c.msg_id)
   FROM `the_ans` c
   where c.msg_id = d.id) AS counter,
  (SELECT c.msg
   FROM `the_ans` c
   WHERE c.msg_id=d.id
   ORDER BY `time` DESC LIMIT 1) as lastmsg
FROM
  `the_data` d
ORDER BY `time_updated` DESC LIMIT 26340 ,15

EXPLAIN:

id select_type table type possible_keys key key_len ref rows Extra
1 PRIMARY d ALL 34309 Using filesort
3 DEPENDENT SUBQUERY c ALL 43659 Using where; Using filesort
2 DEPENDENT SUBQUERY c ALL 43659 Using where

This query examines 65,396,669,012,829 rows, which is unacceptable in shared hosting.

tbh, i don't understand their explanation.. what the query actually does is to get 15 posts order by time updated, for each post i grab the latest comment, count all comments for each post.

posts table - 'the_data'

comments table = 'the_ans'

i'm not a mysql guru and i don't know how to improve this query any help will be appreciated

thx

the query

SELECT
  `id` , `nick` , `msg` , `uid` , `show_pic` , `time` , `ip` , `time_updated` , (
    SELECT COUNT( c.msg_id )
    FROM `the_ans` c
    WHERE c.msg_id = d.id
   ) AS counter, (
    SELECT c.msg
    FROM `the_ans` c
    WHERE c.msg_id = d.id
    ORDER BY `time` DESC
    LIMIT 1
   ) AS lastmsg
FROM `the_data` d
ORDER BY `time_updated` DESC
LIMIT 26340 , 15 

this is the results structure

id| nick  | msg  | uid   | show_pick | time      | ip |time_updated|counter|lastmsg
  |       |      |       |           |           |    |            |       |
7 | jqman | hello| 10074 |   0       |2013-21-01 | 12 |2013-21-01  | 55    |blah bl
share|improve this question
    
Are you sure about the LIMIT 26340, 15 part? –  inhan Jan 21 '13 at 16:05
1  
The basic problem is that the query needs to be executed to obtain your 15 rows. To execute you main query, each of the subqueries needs to be executed for each row processed. Can you post the results of show create table for each of the tables? Have you created indexes for "id" in each table? –  Jaydee Jan 21 '13 at 16:09
    
Generally, an uncorrelated subquery will perform better than a correlated one. The generic syntax is as follows: SELECT x.* FROM my_table x JOIN (SELECT id,MAX(time) max_time FROM my_table GROUP BY id) y ON y.id = x.id AND y.max_time = x.time; That will get you the most recent message in each thread. Then you just join the other info onto that (or vice versa) –  Strawberry Jan 21 '13 at 16:15
    
no i didn't add indexes, i only have one index (id) for each table –  eben Jan 21 '13 at 17:17
    
@inhan - this is part of the pagination mechanism, we can just limit 15, i have added the structure to the main post –  eben Jan 21 '13 at 17:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A quick glance at the explain plan shows that there are no suitable indexes for MySQL to use, so it's resorting to full table scans.

 EXPLAIN: 
 id select_type        table type possible_keys key key_len ref rows  Extra 
 -- ------------------ ----- ---- ------------- --- ------- --- ----- ---------------------------- 
 1  PRIMARY            d     ALL                                34309 Using filesort
 3  DEPENDENT SUBQUERY c     ALL                                43659 Using where; Using filesort 
 2  DEPENDENT SUBQUERY c     ALL                                43659 Using where

To optimize the execution of the existing query, you need to add appropriate indexes. Likely candidates:

ON `the_data`(`time_updated`)
ON `the_ans`(`msg_id`,`time`)

Those indexes will significantly improve the performance of both the outer query (likely eliminating the sort operation), and the numerous executions of the correlated subqueries.


Beyond that, you're going to need to change the query to improve performance. The LIMIT clause on the outermost query is being applied after the entire resultset is prepared, which means those two correlated subqueries are getting executed for every row in table the_data. And that's going to eat your lunch, performance wise.

To have those correlated subqueries run only for the (up to) 15 rows that are being returned, you need to get that LIMIT clause applied before those subqueries get run.

This query should return an equivalent resultset, and will avoid 34,000+ executions of each correlated subquery, which should improve performance considerably:

SELECT d.*
     , ( SELECT COUNT( c.msg_id )
           FROM `the_ans` c
          WHERE c.msg_id = d.id
       ) AS counter
     , ( SELECT c.msg
           FROM `the_ans` c
          WHERE c.msg_id = d.id
          ORDER BY `time` DESC
          LIMIT 1
       ) AS lastmsg
  FROM ( SELECT e.`id` 
              , e.`nick`
              , e.`msg`
              , e.`uid`
              , e.`show_pic`
              , e.`time`
              , e.`ip`
              , e.`time_updated` 
           FROM `the_data` e
          ORDER
             BY e.`time_updated` DESC
          LIMIT 26340 , 15 
       ) d
 ORDER BY d.`time_updated` DESC

(Your current query executes each of those correlated subqueries "SELECT COUNT(1) FROM the_data" times. With the rewritten query above, each of those subqueries will be executed only 15 times.)

share|improve this answer
    
well, it seems that the big issue was that i didn't use indexes. also when using ur approach the query executes about 16% faster. thx! –  eben Jan 21 '13 at 17:29
    
when adding indexes about 1000% faster everyday we learn something new –  eben Jan 21 '13 at 17:31
    
@JQman: yes, the absence of indexes is the big issue. And that's a fix that can be applied without deploying any code changes. It would be good to get the EXPLAIN output for the query with those indexes added. –  spencer7593 Jan 21 '13 at 17:33

Perform the correlated subqueries after selecting the time-limited rows from the main query:

SELECT d.*,
       (SELECT COUNT(c.msg_id)
        FROM `the_ans` c
        where c.msg_id = d.id) AS counter,
       (SELECT c.msg
        FROM `the_ans` c
        WHERE c.msg_id=d.id
        ORDER BY `time` DESC LIMIT 1) as lastmsg
FROM (SELECT
        `id`, `nick`, `msg`, `uid`, `show_pic`,
        `time`,`ip`,`time_updated`
      FROM
        `the_data`
      ORDER BY `time_updated` DESC LIMIT 26340 ,15) d

Also, make sure you have indexes on time_updated and msg_id.

share|improve this answer

Something like this should give you the result a bit quicker.

Note that this is using INNER JOINs as it is intended to work when every record on *the_data* has at least one matching record on *the_ans*

SELECT `id` , `nick` , `msg` , `uid` , `show_pic` , `time` , `ip` , `time_updated` , Sub1.counter, c.msg AS lastmsg
FROM `the_data` d
INNER JOIN (SELECT msg_id, COUNT( * ) AS counter, MAX( `time` ) AS MaxTime FROM `the_ans` GROUP BY msg_id) Sub1 ON d.id = Sub1.msg_id
INNER JOIN the_ans c ON d.id = c.msg_id AND sub1.MaxTime = c.`time`
ORDER BY `time_updated` DESC
LIMIT 26340 , 15 
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.