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I was trying to make an adjustable sequence of time by using scheduleatfixedrate. However, when I made this block of code I didn't know that one can't change the period after it has been executed unless the timer is purged.

This is my attempt at a sequenced series of events:

@Override
protected void onStart()
{


    super.onStart();

    Timer timer = new Timer();
    GregorianCalendar gCal = (GregorianCalendar) GregorianCalendar.getInstance();




    final Runnable countDivision = new Runnable()
    {
        public void run()
        {

            /**
             * Starts the sequence and wraps around when reached the last position
             */

            if(playSequenceButton.isChecked())
            {
                setEnabled(true);
                int length = sequencer.getLength();
                int i = sequencer.getPosition();
                DIODE[i].setChecked(true);
                if(i > 0)
                    DIODE[i-1].setChecked(false);
                if (i < 1)
                    DIODE[length].setChecked(false);



            }
            /**
             * Stops and resets the sequence
             */
            else
            {
                for (int i = 0; i < sequencer.getLength(); i++)
                    DIODE[i].setChecked(false);

                sequencer.setPosition(START_POSITION);
                setEnabled(false);

            }
        }
    };

    int millis = 999 - gCal.get(GregorianCalendar.MILLISECOND);
    int inputBPM = TEMPO;
    long qtrN=Math.round(((60000/inputBPM))*100000)/100000;

    long sixteenN = (qtrN/4);
    sixteenN=Math.round(sixteenN*100000)/100000;


    timer.scheduleAtFixedRate(new TimerTask()
    {

        @Override
        public void run()
        {
            //              setEnabled(true);
            runOnUiThread(countDivision);               

        }

    }, 0, sixteenN);



}

What method would you recommend for setting a period time that can be dynamically altered? The sixteenN variable needs to be able to change while the runnable countDivision is running. Maybe a timertask isn't the right tool?

Regards /M

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use a new timer each time. or use an alarmmanager –  njzk2 Jan 21 '13 at 15:52
    
that was so obvious I didn't even see it.. Thanks! However, this causes the event to be run at two different intervals. I suppose I need to cancel the previous timer, but this gives me a nullpointerexception. –  hacke Jan 22 '13 at 8:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Just cancel and reschedule the TimerTask!

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I did just that after some problems with the formatting and where to put what. It works fine now. ^^ –  hacke Feb 14 '13 at 12:05

I would avoid the TimerTask and use a Handler instead. The Handler is useful for cross-thread communication, delays and timers, and actually quite simple to use.

The following example shows how to create a timed event loop with a Handler:-

public class HandlerExampleActivity extends Activity {
    private static final String TAG = HandlerExampleActivity.class.getSimpleName();

    private static final int MSG_PING = 1;
    private static final long MSG_DELAY = 1000;

    @Override
    protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);

        ping();
    }

    void ping() {

        Log.d(TAG, "Ping!");

        mHandler.sendEmptyMessageDelayed(MSG_PING, MSG_DELAY);
    }

    void pong() {
        Log.d(TAG, "Pong!");

        ping();
    }

    private Handler mHandler = new Handler() {
        public void handleMessage(android.os.Message msg) {
            if(msg.what == MSG_PING) {
                pong();
            }
        };
    };
}

In Android, Handlers are the right way to go if you want timed events, there are several options you can use to send messages to a Handler, and you can even use Runnables:-

    mHandler.sendEmptyMessage(MSG_PING); // Send ping (almost) immediately
    mHandler.sendEmptyMessageAtTime(MSG_PING, 
                             SystemClock.uptimeMillis() + MSG_DELAY); // one second from now
    mHandler.postAtTime(new Runnable() { // Even post runnables!
        @Override
        public void run() {
            // TODO Something...
        }
    }, MSG_DELAY);    

You can replace MSG_DELAY with an interval that can change dynamically to do what you want.

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