Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have code like:

obj1 = SomeObject.method1();
if (obj1 != null) {
  obj2 = obj1.method2();
  if (obj2 != null) {
     obj3 = obj2.method3();
     if (obj3 != null) {
              ............


     return objN.methodM();

   }
  }
 }
....

I have near 10 steps. It seems very fragile and error prone. Is there a better way to check on null chained methods?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Unfortunately it is fragile, and it's not because of the fact that it may return null. Chains like this should be avoided or you risk creating dependencies. –  Neil Jan 21 '13 at 15:52
1  
If null's are rare do not check them, use exceptions to handle errors. –  Leonidos Jan 21 '13 at 15:53
1  
@Leonidos It depends on the contract whether it is an error to return null (e.g. java.lang.System.console() can return null if no console is available). One thing I would change is to negate the checks and check if the result is null, and return from the method in that case. This avoids the deep nesting of scopes (which I find hard to read, usually). –  Andreas Jan 21 '13 at 15:56
    
Are these objects all of the same type? –  Kevin Bowersox Jan 21 '13 at 15:57
    
Would it be important to know which of them IS null if one would be? –  Fildor Jan 21 '13 at 16:01

7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It's common problem for null references in java.

I prefer chaining with &&:

if (obj1 != null && obj1.method1() != null && obj1.method1().method2() != null)
share|improve this answer
1  
This is good, but will not work for 10 methods, it's not possible to see wat the code is doing. –  GaborSch Jan 21 '13 at 16:01
4  
We don't know that the methods have no side effects, and to avoid calling them multiple times anyway, you should do if ((obj2 = obj1.method2()) != null && (obj3 = obj2.method3()) != null && ...) if you're going to chain with &&. –  Nikita Kouevda Jan 21 '13 at 16:04
    
@NikitaKouevda good point –  mishadoff Jan 21 '13 at 16:08
    
@NikitaKouevda That's true, +1 –  GaborSch Jan 21 '13 at 16:30

Write like

obj1 = SomeObject.method1();
if (obj1 == null) 
    return;
 obj2 = obj1.method2();
 if (obj2 == null) 
    return;

etc. As a C developer this is a very common paradigm and is extremely common. If it's not possible to convert your code to this flat flow then your code needs to be refactored in the first place, regardless of what language it exists in.

Replace return with whatever you are actually doing in the case where these fail, whether that be return null, throw an exception, etc. - you've omitted that part of your code but it should be the same logic.

share|improve this answer
    
Multiple exit points from a method will not make the code more clear. –  GaborSch Jan 21 '13 at 16:05
2  
@GaborSch It won't make it more complicated in this case, either: failing fast, and not forcing the code reader to skip over large chunks of code to see what happens if it isn't null, increases readability. –  Dave Newton Jan 21 '13 at 16:08
    
@DaveNewton That is one point I can accept, but generally it is better not to jump out early. If you just return null;, that's OK, but if there are more complex return statements like return new("blahblah", 12, methodX(obj.whatever())); it would just obfuscate the reader (try to find the differences between 10 similar lines). Also increases the chances for an error. –  GaborSch Jan 21 '13 at 16:17
    
@GaborSch I agree with last point, but 1) if OP is doing that in the rest of the code in the ..., it will still be clearer to use proposed style, and 2) if OP is doing that anyway, as noted the code needs to be refactored regardless of language/style. Most likely the returns should be replaced by throw IllegalArgumentException as the function had preconditions that couldn't be fulfilled, or log and return null if all of the code base is return null-oriented. –  djechlin Jan 21 '13 at 16:19
    
@GaborSch I disagree that a generalization can be made. IMO it is much easier to read code if it's very clear, very early, what happens. If you have an over-complicated return statement, as in your example, I find it unlikely that (a) it could be constructed the same way at all return points, and (b) if it could, that the developer wouldn't create a local variable to hold that value for re-use. –  Dave Newton Jan 21 '13 at 16:20

More context is necessary to answer this question well.

For example, in some cases I'd advocate breaking out the inner if statements into their own methods, following the "each method should do a single thing, completely and correctly." In this case, calling the method and checking for null is that single thing: if it's null, it returns (or throws, depending on your actual needs). If it isn't, it calls the next method.

Ultimately I suspect this is a design issue, though, the solution to which is unknowable without insight into the problem being solved.

As it stands, this single chunk of code requires deep knowledge of (what I suspect are) multiple responsibilities, meaning in almost all cases, new classes, new patterns, new interfaces, or some combination would be required to make this both clean, and understandable.

share|improve this answer

I thinh this kind of question was already answered here. Especially see the second aswer about Null Object Pattern .

share|improve this answer

You can chain them and surround everything with a try/catch and catch the NPE.

Like this:

try
{
    Object result = SomeObject.method1().method2().methodN();
    return result;
}
catch(NullPointerException ex)
{
     // Do the errorhandling here.
}

Outside that I second @Neil's comment: Try to avoid that kind of chains in the first place.

share|improve this answer
5  
Throwing and catching an exception is very heavy operation, don't do that. –  GaborSch Jan 21 '13 at 15:55
1  
This way you swallow NullPointerException that can be thrown by any chained method. –  mishadoff Jan 21 '13 at 15:58
1  
I really don't suggest this. How would you now in this case is exception because method2 returned null or methodN thrown exception because of some bug? –  partlov Jan 21 '13 at 15:58
1  
Who said it is important? From what the OP sais, he just needs the chainmembers to not be null. –  Fildor Jan 21 '13 at 15:59
2  
stackoverflow.com/questions/3490770/… reading this thread changes my opinion on speed.. –  Arpit Jan 21 '13 at 16:09

Try to format this way:

obj1 = SomeObject.method1();
if (obj1 != null) {
   obj2 = obj1.method2();
}
if (obj2 != null) {
    obj3 = obj2.method3();
}
if (obj3 != null) {
          ............
}

if (objN != null) {
   return objN.methodM();
}
return null;

Don't forget to initialize all your objs to null.

share|improve this answer
    
@Fildor Nesting blocks are impossible to look through. –  GaborSch Jan 21 '13 at 16:19
    
That's correct. I just wanted to know if I miss anything outside that. –  Fildor Jan 21 '13 at 16:22
obj1 = SomeObject.method1();
if (obj1 == null) throw new IllegalArgumentException("...");

obj2 = obj1.method2();
if (obj2 == null) throw new IllegalArgumentException("...");

obj3 = obj2.method3();
if (obj3 == null) throw new IllegalArgumentException("...");

if (objN != null) {
   return objN.methodM();
}

Some more discussion here

share|improve this answer
    
where is the catch?? –  Arpit Jan 21 '13 at 16:03
1  
in the function that calls this function ;p –  Daniel Magnusson Jan 21 '13 at 16:05
1  
@Arpit ftr this isn't just a joke, it's very likely the correct design. ("Likely" because if the entire code base is oriented toward returning null on error it's not great to be the one function relying on exceptions.) –  djechlin Jan 21 '13 at 16:17
    
ya that's true. i'm laughing on your ';p' –  Arpit Jan 21 '13 at 16:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.