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I want that an LED should turn on at any random time within 15 seconds. For example after pressing a button it should turn on after 4 seconds or 7 seconds, that is randomly.

I came up with the code to produce a 15 second delay, but I cant figure out a way to select a random time between this.

Below is my code for the 15 second delay:

always @ (posedge clock or posedge reset)
begin
 if(reset)

  ticker <= 0;

 else if(ticker == 750000000) //if it reaches the desired max value that equates 15 second reset it
  ticker <= 0;
 else if(start) //only start if the input is set high
  ticker <= ticker + 1;
end

assign click = ((ticker == 750000000)?1'b1:1'b0); //click to be assigned high every 0.1 second

Also I want a synthesizable solution please.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need a hardware way to create a random number. You have $random for simulation but not hardware.

I would suggest creating an lfsr which runs and when a button is pressed, you capture the current value which you count up to, or preset a counter and count down to 0.

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Thank you. Ive been looking into LFSR as advised and am greatly confused by the selection of taps. What determines which feedback bits must be used? Also I can find a consistent example on it. Thanks –  ipunished Jan 23 '13 at 8:15
1  
This might be best done by starting another question. You need to decide how many random numbers you need (feedback terms), Or maybe just the (bit) width of a random number. An example Verilog lfsr For choosing taps make sure you have a maximal LFSR. –  Morgan Jan 23 '13 at 8:42
    
Thanks. I just need a 30 bit wide pseudo random number from this, I care not for the number of random terms before it starts repeating. I was trying to understand the link you posted, I understand that "iterations per value" show the random numbers before it starts repeating. Am I right? But what is the start and end value? As it does not show the tap arrangement. Can I just use any tap arrangement and get away with it? Thank you –  ipunished Jan 24 '13 at 7:17
1  
@ipunished, I have added this Q&A stackoverflow.com/questions/14497877/… Please add comments there if I have missed anything. –  Morgan Jan 24 '13 at 9:29
    
Dude, you are a legend. A clear detailed explanation was greatly needed regarding LFSR. Thanks a lot :) –  ipunished Jan 25 '13 at 6:32

If you need a random number in hardware, you can use a Linear feedback shift register (LFSR) circuit to generates a pseudorandom number.

LFSRs are easy to implement and you'll find many examples online.

When you get a button press, you can capture the current value of the LFSR to a register (you may need to scale in some way for your application) and use that value to count seconds until you turn on the LED.

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Thank you. Ive been looking into LFSR as advised and am greatly confused by the selection of taps. What determines which feedback bits must be used? Thanks –  ipunished Jan 23 '13 at 8:14

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