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I would like some help explaining this phenomenom:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class A
{
public:
    void m() {cout<<"A::m "<<this<<endl;};
};

class B1:  public A
{
public:
    void m() {cout<<"B::m "<<this<<endl;};
};

class B2:  public A ,public B1
{
};

class D : public B2
{};

int main()
{
    B2 b;
    D d;
    A* a = &b; // Row 27
    //error: a = &d;  Base class 'A' is ambiguous // Row 28
    return 0;
}

Why does the code in Row27 work but the code in Row28 doesnt? Thank in advance!

Note: I am well aware of virtual inheritance, I just want to know what is the difference between Row27 and Row28 - why one throw a compilation error when the other not?

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2  
    
It doesnt' apply here, otherwise Row27 will not work either! what is the difference betwwen row27 and row 28? –  YoniXw Jan 21 '13 at 17:44
    
what compiler are you using? Row 27 doesn't compile either here –  Andy Prowl Jan 21 '13 at 17:54
    
Visual Studio C++ 2010 Express –  YoniXw Jan 21 '13 at 17:55
1  
VS2010 does indeed compile it, but issues a warning which suggests it is ignoring B2's inheritance from A. this is why Row 27 works. I think this is a weird behavior of VS2010 and I don't know if there is a way to turn it off (other than considering all warnings as errors) –  Andy Prowl Jan 21 '13 at 18:06
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Because you are using non-virtual inheritance to derive from A, which indirectly creates two sub-objects of type A in every object of type D. The compiler cannot disambiguate which sub-object you refer to when doing the pointer-to-derived to pointer-to-base conversion, and issues an error.

In order to have only one sub-object of type A generated for objects of type D, you have to make inheritance from A virtual along the inheritance paths which make D derive from A:

class B1:  virtual public A
{
    // ...
};

class B2:  virtual public A, public B1
{
};

EDIT:

I tried to compile your example on Visual Studio 2010 SP1, which gives me a warning about the definition of B2:

class B2: public A, public B1
{
};

1>sotest.cpp(18): warning C4584: 'B2' : base-class 'A' is already a base-class of 'B1'
1>          sotest.cpp(6) : see declaration of 'A'
1>          sotest.cpp(11) : see declaration of 'B1'

In other words, for some reason VC10 seems to consider the inheritance from A redundant and ignores it. This is why the assignment A* a = &b; compiles: class B2 actually inherits from A only once (through B1). The same is not true of D, because VC10 has probably no redundant inheritance to ignore, and D effectively inherits from A twice (through B1 and through B2).

I ignore the reasons why VC10 behaves this way, and I do not know if there is a compiler option to suppress this behavior. Remarkably, both GCC 4.7.2 and Clang 3.2 refuse to compile the assignment A* a = &b;.

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then why the code in Row27 work? why it doesnt require virtual inheritance!? B2 has the same amount of 'A' just like 'D'! –  YoniXw Jan 21 '13 at 17:47
    
@user1997873: does it really work? I just tried it on GCC 4.7.1 and Clang 3.2 and i get a compiler error unless I use virtual inheritance. what compiler are you using? –  Andy Prowl Jan 21 '13 at 17:50
    
Visual Studio C++ 2010 Express –  YoniXw Jan 21 '13 at 17:53
1  
So this answer is basically "I don't know" –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 21 '13 at 18:11
1  
I've been lurking and I'm confused -- if VC10 is ignoring the redundant inheritance of A in B2, then the inheritance hierarchy looks like this: A -> B1 -> B2 -> D, right? But that shouldn't cause any problems, that's just a normal inheritance hierarchy. So doesn't it seem like VC10 is behaving inconsistently then? Ignoring the inheritance from A when B2 is declared (and giving B2 only one copy of A's members), but still giving D two copies of A's members? –  Emily Jan 21 '13 at 18:15
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For future users it seems:

I just tried it on GCC 4.7.1 and Clang 3.2 and i get a compiler error unless I use virtual inheritance. what compiler are you using? – Andy Prowl

VS2010 does indeed compile, but issues a warning which suggests it is ignoring B2's inheritance from A. this is why Row 27 works. I think this is a weird behavior of VS2010 and I don't know if there is a way to turn it off (other than considering all warnings as errors) – Andy Prowl

thank you @Andy Prowl.

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