Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have got a list of strings, taken from the selectorText of many CSSRule, the strings has the general form (not sure about that RegEx):

".selector1 .elementClass[, ]*"

Concrete Examples are the following:

".point"
".point.lackofclearance .stand_b, .point.lackofclearance .stand_c"
".point .path_a,.point .path,.point .stand"
".blink_on .point.direction_open .stand"
".blink_off .point.a_in_ratc_selection .path_a, .blink_off .point
 .path.a_in_ratc_selection"

Now, out of such strings, interesting are those containing the string "point", and out of those string that contain the string "point", I am interested in the substring coming immediately after ".point." and before the next space character. They represent states of Elements that I would like to read.

For example:

From ".point" there is no such substring to extract, and from ".point .path_a,.point .path,.point .stand" also, nothing to extract, because ".point." doesn't exist as one piece at all. BUT for ".point.lackofclearance .stand_b, .point.lackofclearance .stand_c" I would like to extract "lackofclearance" , the first and second occurence of it, of course.

I have an idea in my head already, and that is:

  • Check if the string "point" exists
  • If yes, split the string by ','
  • for each resulting substring, split by '' (space character)
  • for each resulting substring, containing ".point.", split by '.' (dot char)
  • take the second substring of the last split

Does any body has another suggestion, a chic way of doing it, may be shorter, or more efficient, or both... It has to be done in JavaScript, in Chrome, jQuery is available.

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Regular expressions are awesome. You simply look for a literal ".point." followed by a word "\w+". Capture that word with parens (\w+). Then call match on a string, pass in the regex and get the second item of the returned result, which is the captured subgroup word, the thing you want.

var whatWeFound = ".point.omgyesawesome .foo".match(/\.point\.(\w+)/)[1];
console.log(whatWeFound); //=> "omgyesawesome"
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, the RegEx you provided, returned only the first occurance, so if I have ".point.lackofclearance .stand_b, .point.lackofclearanceCritical .stand_c" , I can only extract lackofclearance, but I also want lackofclearanceCritical. I then tried this /\.point\.(\S+)/g RegEx, I get as a result [".point.lackofclearance", ".point.lackofclearanceCritical"] , not exactly what I want, but I can then apply your RegEx of each, and take what I want –  StaticBug Jan 21 '13 at 19:36
var str = ".point.lackofclearance .stand_b, .point.lackofclearance .stand_c";
var re = /\.point\.(\w+)/g;
var result = [];
var m;
while (m = re.exec(str)) {
  result.push(m[1]);
}
// result == ['lackofclearance', 'lackofclearance']
share|improve this answer

You can easily use regular expressions for such a task.

var m = selectorText.match(/\.point.\w+/)
for (var i=0; m!=null && i<m.length; i++)
    console.log(m[i].substring(7)); // remove ".point." part
share|improve this answer
var strings =  "YOUR_CLASS_STRINGS".split(" ");
var regex = /\.point\.(\S+)/;
var arr = [];

for(x in strings){
    if(regex_string = strings[x].match(regex)){ 
        arr.push(regex_string[1]);
    }
}

This should result in arr being populated only with the class names the proceed .point.

share|improve this answer

Based on the answers given above, I adjusted the RegEx to fit my needs, and this one seems to do the job.

/\.point\.(.+\s)/

When Applied

".point.vacancy_unknown.direction_open .path_a".match(/\.point\.(.+\s)/)

I get the following result.

[".point.vacancy_unknown.direction_open ", "vacancy_unknown.direction_open "]
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.