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I want to do this

lol = Klass.new(values)

unless lol 
   print "false"
end

lol.other_method  # it is not nil or false, it is a Klass instance!

But lol, in this case, is not nil or false, but an object who can act as a false based on some internal value. I have this alternative

lol = Klass.new(values)

unless lol.to_bool
   print "false"
end

But it is ugly IMHO.

I was thinking in extend the FalseClass or play with == but without success. Any Ideas?

share|improve this question
    
It's not clear : what is Klass.method(values) Is it Object#method ? It takes a method name as argument and returns a Method, which you can later call. –  user1852994 Jan 21 '13 at 18:59
    
instead method, imagine a "new" or a constructor –  Tiago Peczenyj Jan 21 '13 at 19:10
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Unfortunately, this is not possible.

This is one of those annoying cases where Ruby is not object-oriented. In OO, it must be possible for one object to simulate another (in fact, depending on whom you ask, this is the very definition of OO – remember that OO came out of simulation), but it is not possible to build an object which simulates false.

This is because, in Ruby, conditional control structures are baked into the language and don't translate into message sends, whereas in other OO languages they are just regular message sends (or at least translate into message sends, just like for in Ruby translates into each). For example, in Smalltalk, Booleans are actually implemented using the Church encoding of Booleans you know from Lambda Calculus, and translated to Ruby they look a bit like this:

class FalseClass
  def if(&block)
    # do nothing
  end

  def if_then_else(then_lambda, else_lambda)
    else_lambda.()
  end

  def not
    true
  end

  def and(&block)
    self
  end

  def or(&block)
    block.()
  end
end

And TrueClass is just the mirror image:

class TrueClass
  def if(&block)
    block.()
  end

  def if_then_else(then_lambda, else_lambda)
    then_lambda.()
  end

  def not
    false
  end

  def and(&block)
    block.()
  end

  def or(&block)
    self
  end
end

And then, instead of something like

if 2 < 3 then foo end
if 2 < 3 then bar else baz end

You would have

(2 < 3).if { foo }
(2 < 3).if_then_else(-> { bar }, -> { baz })

# using the new keyword arguments in Ruby 2.0, it almost reads like Smalltalk:
class FalseClass
  def if(then: -> {}, else: -> {})
    else.()
  end
end

class TrueClass
  def if(then: -> {}, else: -> {})
    then.()
  end
end

(2 < 3).if(then: -> { bar }, else: { baz })

That way, you can easily create an object which simulates false simply by implementing the respective methods.

In other cases, where some object really absolutely must be an instance of a specific class and not just speak the correct protocol, Ruby provides an escape hatch. For example, if a method really requires an Array as an argument, then it will first try to call to_ary to at least give you a chance to convert your object into an Array. The same goes for to_str, to_int, to_proc, to_float etc. But there is no equivalent to_bool protocol.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I was trying to do this: github.com/peczenyj/Lazy-Bool - I choose Perl BTW. I will think about your example and try to do something similar em Ruby. –  Tiago Peczenyj Jan 23 '13 at 23:12
add comment

Short answer: Don't do this.

The long answer is that in Ruby there are only two things that evaluate as false: false and nil. Literally everything else evaluates as true.

Many applications depend on this behavior and will probably malfunction if you somehow manage to change this. It's like defining 1 to be an even number. It's going to cause problems.

share|improve this answer
    
in this case, the best option is add a .to_bool to evaluate this in boolean context, right? –  Tiago Peczenyj Jan 21 '13 at 19:21
2  
@TiagoPeczenyj an object who can act as a false based on some internal value -> just add a false? method which answers that internal value and then unless lol.false?. It's not ugly, but good Ruby duck typing, if I don't mistake. –  user1852994 Jan 21 '13 at 19:30
    
Adding a false? method seems more than a little strange, especially considering false.false? would be an undefined method. –  tadman Jan 22 '13 at 17:43
    
yes... sounds good! –  Tiago Peczenyj Jan 23 '13 at 23:24
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