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Error message in question:

HEAP CORRUPTION DETECTED: after Normal block (#147) at
0x0044B900.
CRT detected that the application wrote to memory after end of heap
buffer.

Here is the code, basically checks for prime numbers up till a number you enter. I know that everything works except basically the deleting of the old array. I put the cout << "attempting delete" to see if it would output that before the delete and it crashes after it outputs the text and before it outputs after the delete so it seems to be right there. http://puu.sh/1QGWH

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int acquireInput();
bool isPrime(int num);
bool isFull(int arraySize, int found);
int expandArray(int arraySize);
void copyArray(int *intArray, int found, int arraySize);
void store(int *intArray, int found, int i);


void main()
{
    int* intArray = NULL;
    int arraySize = 0;
    int found = -1;
    intArray = new int[arraySize];

    cout << "\n------------\n Dynamic Prime Number Array \n------------\n\n\n";

    int maxNTC = acquireInput();
    for (int i = 2; i <= maxNTC; i++)
    {
        if (isPrime(i))
        {
            cout << endl << i << " is prime, checking to see if array is full. ";
            found++;
            if (isFull(arraySize, found))
            {
                cout << "Array is full" << endl;
                copyArray(intArray, found, arraySize);
            }
            else
            {
                cout << "\n not full";
                store(intArray, found, i);
            }
        }
    }
}

bool isFull(int arraySize, int found)
{
    return found > arraySize;
}

void copyArray(int *intArray, int found, int arraySize)
{

    int* newIntArray = new int[(arraySize *2) +1];
    for (int i = 0; i < found; i++)
    {
        cout << found;
        newIntArray[i] = intArray[i];
        cout << endl << intArray[i] << " moved, now " << newIntArray[i];
    }

    arraySize = (arraySize * 2) +1;
    cout << "Attempting delete";
    delete [] intArray;
    cout << "Attempting replacing pointer";
    intArray = newIntArray;
}

void store(int *intArray, int found, int i)
{
    cout << "\n Inserting " << i << " at postion: " << found;
    intArray[found] = i;
}
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closed as too localized by Vlad Lazarenko, Bo Persson, talonmies, Useless, Lars Kotthoff Jan 21 '13 at 19:06

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1  
Debugging tip: The heap managers can only detect heap corruption when their functions are called. That means that the print of Heap Corruption Detected at the delete does not mean the error is there at the delete. It is more likely that your program overwrote part of the heap while it was running and the error is far before the delete. –  Zan Lynx Jan 21 '13 at 18:41
2  
You do realize that you're trying to create a dynamic array of size 0, right? –  Vite Falcon Jan 21 '13 at 18:43
1  
@Vite: No no no that is not proof. The array size is still 0. But you are misinterpreting the results of sizeof -- firstly, some memory is still used for the zero-length array because otherwise addressing wouldn't work but it's still a zero-length array. Secondly, you measured a pointer, not an array. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 21 '13 at 18:57
4  
@ViteFalcon: I don't understand your proof, you measured that a pointer is 4 bytes. Good job: ideone.com/Uq6HtB –  Mooing Duck Jan 21 '13 at 18:57
2  
The real solution to this question is to use std::vector<int>, in which case the copy is done with std::vector<int> destination = source;. –  Cat Plus Plus Jan 21 '13 at 18:59

2 Answers 2

The main problem is here:

void copyArray(int *intArray, int found, int arraySize)
{

    int* newIntArray = new int[(arraySize *2) +1];
    ....
    intArray = newIntArray;
}

Since the pointer is passed by value, the new intArray pointer isn't propagated back to the caller. Either pass the pointer by reference, or turn it into int**.

There's also an off-by-one error in:

        found++;
        if (isFull(arraySize, found))
        {
            copyArray(intArray, found, arraySize);
                                ^^^^^ includes the about-to-be-added element

You're copying one element too many, which results in undefined behaviour in copyArray.

share|improve this answer
    
So passing the intArray as *&intArray will fix the issue? –  Nogg Jan 21 '13 at 18:48
    
@Nogg: Yes, that should fix the main issue. –  NPE Jan 21 '13 at 18:52
    
I did that and I still get an error message. And I also subtract one from found in the copyArray function (Just a temporary fix) –  Nogg Jan 21 '13 at 18:53
    
@Nogg: If I were you, I'd simply run the program under valgrind. That should pinpoint most of the remaning problems. –  NPE Jan 21 '13 at 18:54
1  
@Nogg In addition to intArray, also arraySize must be passed as a reference (or returned and assigned to main's arraySize. Also, in isFull(), you must check found >= arraySize, and you also must store the new found prime when the array is full. –  Daniel Fischer Jan 21 '13 at 18:58

your problem is this:

 void copyArray(int *intArray, ...) {
                    ^^^^^^^^^
                    a COPY of a pointer

     delete [] intArray;
    /* ... */
    intArray = newIntArray;
 }

you are telling the system to free the allocated memory which intArray points to. then store the new allocated memory in a COPY of the pointer you handed over to the function. the original pointer still references the memory you have just delete[]d.

the solution is:

  void copyArray(int **intArray, ...) {
                     ^^^^^^^^^^
                     a pointer to the pointer

       int* newIntArray = new int[..];
       delete[] *intArray;
       *intArray = newIntArray;
  }

and then use it like this:

 copyArray(&intArray, found, arraySize);
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