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Given an array of the array [X,Y]:

a=[[1,2],[2,2],[3,2],[4,2],[5,2],[6,2]]

What is the most efficient way to sum all the Y digits for 2<=X<4?

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It seems unimportant, but collections should have plural names (xs, pairs, whatever). IMHO. –  tokland Jan 21 '13 at 19:54

5 Answers 5

I'd work with this:

a.select{ |x,y| (2...4) === x }.inject(0){ |m, (x,y)| m + y }
=> 4

I don't really like using ... though, because it confuses people by how it works. Here are some equivalent ways of testing:

a.select{ |x,y| (2..3) === x }.inject(0){ |m, (x,y)| m + y }
ary.select{ |x,y| (2 <= x) && (x < 4) }.inject(0){ |m, (x,y)| m + y } } }

Here's some benchmark code:

require 'benchmark'

a = [ [1,2], [2,2], [3,2], [4,2], [5,2], [6,2] ]
n = 1_000_000

Benchmark.bm(12) do |b|
  b.report('The Tin Man')  { n.times { a.select{ |x,y| (2...4) === x }.inject(0){ |m, (x,y)| m + y } } }
  b.report('The Tin Man2') { n.times { a.select{ |x,y| (2 <= x) && (x < 4) }.inject(0){ |m, (x,y)| m + y } } }
  b.report('Mik_Die')      { n.times { a.select{ |i| (2...4).include? i[0] }.map(&:last).reduce(:+) } }
  b.report('Justin Ko')    { n.times { a.inject(0){ |sum, coord| (coord[0] >= 2  and coord[0] < 4) ? sum + coord[1] : sum } } }
  b.report('Justin Ko2')   { n.times { a.inject(0){ |sum, (x,y)| (x >= 2  and x < 4) ? sum + y : sum } } }
  b.report('Leo Correa')   { n.times { sum = 0; a.each { |x, y| sum += y if x >= 2 and x < 4 } } }
  b.report('tokland')      { n.times { a.map { |x, y| y if x >= 2 && x < 4 }.compact.inject(0, :+) } }
end

And its output:

                   user     system      total        real
The Tin Man    4.020000   0.000000   4.020000 (  4.020154)
The Tin Man2   2.420000   0.000000   2.420000 (  2.424424)
Mik_Die        3.830000   0.000000   3.830000 (  3.836531)
Justin Ko      2.070000   0.000000   2.070000 (  2.072446)
Justin Ko2     2.000000   0.000000   2.000000 (  2.035079)
Leo Correa     1.260000   0.000000   1.260000 (  1.259672)
tokland        2.650000   0.010000   2.660000 (  2.645466)

The lesson learned here is inject is costly.

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+= can be replaced by simple + –  MikDiet Jan 21 '13 at 19:19
    
That's true. I was thinking in terms of summing into m, but inject will do that correctly. –  the Tin Man Jan 21 '13 at 19:21
    
Is doing a select before the sum more efficient then just an inject below? –  user1896290 Jan 21 '13 at 19:27
    
It's not done for efficiency, it's done for clarity. I'll do a benchmark to figure out whether it's more efficient. –  the Tin Man Jan 21 '13 at 19:30
    
I've never used benchmark, but will start, just for clarify, I thought I lower number is better. as in the process takes less time. Based on @Tinman's comments, "inject" is costly, would mean, it takes more time and is less efficient, however, it has the least time, what am I misunderstanding? thanks! –  user1896290 Jan 21 '13 at 20:08

I would use inject:

a = [[1,2],[2,2],[3,2],[4,2],[5,2],[6,2]]
sum = a.inject(0){ |sum, (x,y)| (x >= 2  and x < 4) ? sum + y : sum }
puts sum
#=> 4

The rdoc describes the inject method well:

inject(initial) {| memo, obj | block } → obj

Combines all elements of enum by applying a binary operation, specified by a block or a symbol that names a method or operator.

If you specify a block, then for each element in enum the block is passed an accumulator value (memo) and the element. If you specify a symbol instead, then each element in the collection will be passed to the named method of memo. In either case, the result becomes the new value for memo. At the end of the iteration, the final value of memo is the return value for the method.

If you do not explicitly specify an initial value for memo, then uses the first element of collection is used as the initial value of memo.

Update - Benchmark Array vs Unpacking:

@tokland had suggested unpacking the pairs, which definitely improves readability. The following benchmark was run to see if it was faster than using the array (ie my original solution).

require 'benchmark'

a = [ [1,2], [2,2], [3,2], [4,2], [5,2], [6,2] ]
n = 2_000_000

Benchmark.bm(12) do |b|
  b.report('array'){n.times{a.inject(0){ |sum, coord| (coord[0] >= 2  and coord[0] < 4) ? sum + coord[1] : sum }}}
  b.report('unpacked'){n.times{a.inject(0){ |sum, (x,y)| (x >= 2  and x < 4) ? sum + y : sum }}}
end

Which gave the results

                   user     system      total        real
array          3.916000   0.000000   3.916000 (  3.925393)
unpacked       3.619000   0.000000   3.619000 (  3.616361)

So, in at least this case, unpacking the pairs is better.

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1  
thanks! I was not sure how to deal with the sub array. Can you explain what the inject code is doing? –  user1896290 Jan 21 '13 at 18:54
    
Notice your answer is not correct. It should be 4 not 5 –  Leo Correa Jan 21 '13 at 19:01
    
The rdoc describes it best - For each element in enum (ie the array a) the block is passed an accumulator value (sum) and the element. The result of the block becomes the new value for sum. At the end of the iteration, the final value of sum is the return value for the method. Conceptually, it is doing what @LeoCorrea did in his answer. –  Justin Ko Jan 21 '13 at 19:03
    
Thanks @LeoCorrea. The code was right, just wrote the answer wrong. Answer fixed. –  Justin Ko Jan 21 '13 at 19:03
1  
you can (and you should) unpack the pairs so you don't have to write array[0] and array[1]. –  tokland Jan 21 '13 at 19:48

I like the inject answer that @JustinKo gave but here's another solution that might be easier to understand if you are new to Ruby.

a=[[1,2],[2,2],[3,2],[4,2],[5,2],[6,2]]
sum = 0
a.each { |x, y| sum += y if x >= 2 and x < 4 }
puts sum
#=> 4
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Thanks, wanted to avoid the .each as inject is more efficient. –  user1896290 Jan 21 '13 at 19:10
    
Actually, running benchmark of both method shows .each being as efficient if not more efficient than .inject in terms of real time speed in seconds. –  Leo Correa Jan 21 '13 at 19:20
    
interesting, I was always told inject was faster. Which benchmark gem are you using? I keep hearing about it, but when I searched rubygems, I find a bunch, not sure which is best. –  user1896290 Jan 21 '13 at 19:23
1  
Built in Ruby benchmark. In IRB or Pry, just require 'benchmark' –  Leo Correa Jan 21 '13 at 19:25
1  
If you worry about speed, ruby is not your way. Anyway, while works about 2x faster than block iterators. –  MikDiet Jan 21 '13 at 19:28

It's more clearly in ruby to use chains of more simple methods. So:

a=[[1,2],[2,2],[3,2],[4,2],[5,2],[6,2]]
a.select{ |i| (2...4).include? i[0] }.map(&:last).reduce(:+)
# => 4 
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but it's also more expensive to use 3 iterators rather than one. –  ChuckE Jan 21 '13 at 19:19
1  
It's the same O(n) solution, as other ones –  MikDiet Jan 21 '13 at 19:24

Conceptually what you'd like to use is a list-comphrehension. Alas, Ruby has no built-in syntax for LCs, but a compact+map does the job just fine:

a.map { |x, y| y if x >= 2 && x < 4 }.compact.inject(0, :+)
#=> 4

If you are writing a medium/large script you'll probably have (and should have) an extensions module. Add the required methods so you can write declarative and concise code:

a.map_select { |x, y| y if x >= 2 && x < 4 }.sum

Or even:

a.sum { |x, y| y if x >= 2 && x < 4 }
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