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So I have this function used to calculate statistics (min/max/std/mean). Now the thing is this runs generally on a 10,000 by 15,000 matrix. The matrix is stored as a vector<vector<int> > inside the class. Now creating and populating said matrix goes very fast, but when it comes down to the statistics part it becomes so incredibly slow.

E.g. to read all the pixel values of the geotiff one pixel at a time takes around 30 seconds. (which involves a lot of complex math to properly georeference the pixel values to a corresponding point), to calculate the statistics of the entire matrix it takes around 6 minutes.

void CalculateStats()
{
	//OHGOD
	double new_mean = 0;
	double new_standard_dev = 0;

	int new_min = 256;
	int new_max = 0;

	size_t cnt = 0;
	for(size_t row = 0; row < vals.size(); row++)
	{
		for(size_t col = 0; col < vals.at(row).size(); col++)
		{
			double mean_prev = new_mean;
			T value = get(row, col);
			new_mean += (value - new_mean) / (cnt + 1);
			new_standard_dev += (value - new_mean) * (value - mean_prev);

			// find new max/min's
			new_min = value < new_min ? value : new_min;
			new_max = value > new_max ? value : new_max;
			cnt++;
		}
	}

	stats_standard_dev = sqrt(new_standard_dev / (vals.size() * vals.at(0).size()) + 1);
	std::cout << stats_standard_dev << std::endl;
}

Am I doing something horrible here?

EDIT

To respond to the comments, T would be an int.

EDIT 2

I fixed my std algorithm, and here is the final product:

void CalculateStats(const std::vector<double>& ignore_values)
{
	//OHGOD
	double new_mean = 0;
	double new_standard_dev = 0;

	int new_min = 256;
	int new_max = 0;

	size_t cnt = 0;

	int n = 0;
	double delta = 0.0;
	double mean2 = 0.0;

	std::vector<double>::const_iterator ignore_begin = ignore_values.begin();
	std::vector<double>::const_iterator ignore_end = ignore_values.end();

	for(std::vector<std::vector<T> >::const_iterator row = vals.begin(), row_end = vals.end();  row != row_end; ++row)
	{
		for(std::vector<T>::const_iterator col = row->begin(), col_end = row->end(); col != col_end; ++col)
		{
			// This method of calculation is based on Knuth's algorithm.
			T value = *col;
			if(std::find(ignore_begin, ignore_end, value) != ignore_end)
				continue;
			n++;
			delta = value - new_mean;
			new_mean = new_mean + (delta / n);
			mean2 = mean2 + (delta * (value - new_mean));

			// Find new max/min's.
			new_min = value < new_min ? value : new_min;
			new_max = value > new_max ? value : new_max;
		}
	}
	stats_standard_dev = mean2 / (n - 1);
	stats_min = new_min;
	stats_max = new_max;
	stats_mean = new_mean;

This still takes ~120-130 seconds to do this, but it's a huge improvement :)!

share|improve this question
5  
What type is T? How does the get method work? –  Managu Sep 18 '09 at 13:28
    
Replacing vals.at(row) with vals[row] will remove range checks. –  Kirill V. Lyadvinsky Sep 18 '09 at 13:33
    
@Kirill, which will totally solve his performance problems. IF of course that's got anything to do with the performane issue. Without profiling the code he CAN'T know what the real issue is –  Glen Sep 18 '09 at 13:39
    
@Glen, surely it is. –  Kirill V. Lyadvinsky Sep 18 '09 at 13:40
2  
The OHGOD comment made me chuckle. I don't know why. –  John Sep 18 '09 at 14:19

16 Answers 16

up vote 29 down vote accepted

Have you tried to profile your code?

You don't even need a fancy profiler. Just stick some debug timing statements in there.

Anything I tell you would just be an educated guess (and probably wrong)

You could be getting lots of cache misses due to the way you're accessing the contents of the vector. You might want to cache some of the results to size() but I don't know if that's the issue.

share|improve this answer
6  
+1 for suggesting profiling –  JeffH Sep 18 '09 at 13:32
7  
Noooooo! I wish I could downvote comments! Time and time again while I've been looking at performance issues I've looked at the code and gone "ooooh thats slow", only to "fix it" and find it makes absolutely no difference - if theres anything I've learnt its that you never guess with performance. –  Justin Sep 18 '09 at 13:49
5  
@hacker: When finding performance bottlenecks, thinking is no substitute for profiling. There's a lot of anecdotal evidence out there; everybody who tries profiling seems to realize that it's far better at picking out the slow spots than they are. –  David Thornley Sep 18 '09 at 14:18
7  
"I'm using bubblesort to sort 100 million items, and it's taking a long time. What should I do? Should I just guess what the problem is, and switch to quicksort, or should I profile my code, identify the bottleneck, and work from there?". Sometimes, programmers do actually know something about programming, and can use that knowledge in their work. Crazy, I know, but true ;-) –  Steve Jessop Sep 18 '09 at 14:30
7  
Algorithmic improvements > profiled optimizations > random people guessing on the internet –  rpetrich Sep 19 '09 at 14:56

I just profiled it. 90% of the execution time was in this line:

new_mean += (value - new_mean) / (cnt + 1);

share|improve this answer
2  
That's the way to do it! @uberjumper: community would even profile it for you :) –  avp Sep 18 '09 at 14:40
3  
+1: Everyone points at things like at() and .size() and stuff. This just highlights that you cannot know where the performance bottleneck is without profiling. –  Kaz Dragon Sep 18 '09 at 14:40
    
how could you profile it? you don't have the implementation of the get function (which as the OP noted in a comment was the real bottleneck)? If you just omitted the get then your results can't be correct –  Glen Sep 18 '09 at 14:44
2  
@Glen: That's a good point. I implemented get as vals[y][x]. Basically I fiddled about to find out what part of the code I did have was slowest. –  Andrew Bainbridge Sep 18 '09 at 14:46
    
@Andrew, that makes sense. It's just unlucky that the real bottleneck was in the one piece of code the OP didn't post. –  Glen Sep 18 '09 at 14:56

You should calculate the sum of values, min, max and count in the first loop, then calculate the mean in one operation by dividing sum/count, then in a second loop calculate std_dev's sum

That would probably be a bit faster.

share|improve this answer
    
@DVK-- std dev can be calculated in a single loop, see my comment for the link. –  mmr Sep 18 '09 at 13:31
    
+1 because I was about to suggest the same thing :P . –  Alterlife Sep 18 '09 at 13:36
1  
With as many data points as there are, summing the entire row could overflow. Better select the next larger data type to hold the running total. –  Les Sep 18 '09 at 15:20
    
Or, if none is available, improvise one, like I did. –  Robert L Sep 19 '09 at 1:30

First thing I spotted is that you evaluate vals.at(row).size() in the loop, which, obviously, isn't supposed to improve performance. It also applies to vals.size(), but of course inner loop is worse. If vals is a vector of vector, you better use iterators or at least keep reference for the outer vector (because get() with indices parameters surely eats up quite some time as well).

This code sample is supposed to illustrate my intentions ;-)

for(TVO::const_iterator i=vals.begin(),ie=vals.end();i!=ie;++i) {
    for(TVI::const_iterator ii=i->begin(),iie=i->end();ii!=iie;++ii) {
        T value = *ii;
        // the rest
    }
}
share|improve this answer
3  
That looks horrible, and until you've got a profile, making that change would be a bad idea. –  Andrew Bainbridge Sep 18 '09 at 14:22
    
Andrew Bainbridge, I'm sorry, but I disagree with you here. I don't find it horrible at all. –  Michael Krelin - hacker Sep 18 '09 at 14:25
    
This runs very marginally slower that the OP on my machine, though personally I'd rewrite most of OP to pull max, min, mean and SD out as algorithms which take iterators just for code cleanliness. –  Pete Kirkham Sep 18 '09 at 14:45
    
@Hacker: OK, horrible was a bit harsh. My point was, without a profile, you shouldn't really be suggesting fixes. If the change made it look nicer, then maybe. –  Andrew Bainbridge Sep 18 '09 at 14:55
1  
Andrew, but I do find iterating through arrays nicer. Honestly. –  Michael Krelin - hacker Sep 18 '09 at 15:05
  • First, change your row++ to ++row. A minor thing, but you want speed, so that will help
  • Second, make your row < vals.size into some const comparison instead. The compiler doesn't know that vals won't change, so it has to play nice and always call size.
  • what is the 'get' method in the middle there? What does that do? That might be your real problem.
  • I'm not too sure about your std dev calculation. Take a look at the wikipedia page on calculating variance in a single pass (they have a quick explanation of Knuth's algorithm, which is an expansion of a recursion relation).
share|improve this answer
1  
Although you're certainly right about preincrementing in general, in this particular case I do not think it matters at all, since compiler should be smart enough to optimize it for size_t with no side effects here. –  Michael Krelin - hacker Sep 18 '09 at 13:31
1  
row++ -> ++row is one of the first optimizations any decent compiler will make. –  ryeguy Sep 18 '09 at 13:50
1  
ryeguy, yup. if it can ;-) (not that easy with overloaded for, say, iterators). –  Michael Krelin - hacker Sep 18 '09 at 13:55

It's slow because you're benchmarking debug code.

Building and running the code on Windows XP using VS2008:

  • a Release build with the default optimisation level, the code in the OP runs in 2734 ms.
  • a Debug build with the default of no optimisation, the code in the OP runs in a massive 398,531 ms.

In comments below you say you're not using optimisation, and this appears to make a big difference in this case - normally it's less that a factor of ten, but in this case it's over a hundred times slower.

I'm using VS2008 rather than 2005, but it's probably similar:

In the Debug build, there are two range checks on each access, each of which calls std::vector::size() using a non-inlined function call and requires a branch predicition. There is overhead involved both with function calls and with branches.

In the Release build, the compiler optimizes away the range checks ( I don't know whether it just drops them, or does flow analysis based on the limits of the loop ), and the vector access becomes a small amount of inline pointer arithmetic with no branches.

No-one cares how fast the debug build is. You should be unit testing the release build anyway, as that's the build which has to work correctly. Only use the Debug build if you don't all the information you want if you try and step through the code.


The code as posted runs in < 1.5 seconds on my PC with test data of 15000 x 10000 integers all equal to 42. You report that it's running in 230 times slower that that. Are you on a 10 MHz processor?

Though there are other suggestions for making it faster ( such as moving it to use SSE, if all the values are representable using 8bit types ), but there's clearly something else which is making it slow.

On my machine, neither a version which hoisted a reference to the vector for the row and hoisting the size of the row, nor a version which used iterator had any measurable benefit ( with g++ -O3 using iterators takes 1511ms repeatably; the hoisted and original version both take 1485ms ). Not optimising means it runs in 7487ms ( original ), 3496ms ( hoisted ) or 5331ms ( iterators ).

But unless you're running on a very low power device, or are paging, or a running non-optimised code with a debugger attached, it shouldn't be this slow, and whatever is making it slow is not likely to be the code you've posted.

( as a side note, if you test it with values with a deviation of zero your SD comes out as 1 )

share|improve this answer
    
P4 3 Gigs of Ram. I am so confused. :| –  UberJumper Sep 18 '09 at 14:46
    
What compiler? Are you running with optimisations turned on? –  Pete Kirkham Sep 18 '09 at 14:49
    
Visual Studio 2005, no optimization. But optimization should not make that big of a difference for that section fo code? –  UberJumper Sep 18 '09 at 14:55
    
@Pete, the OP mentions in a comment to my answer that the issue was in the 'get' method. The one piece of code that wasn't available to benchmark...... –  Glen Sep 18 '09 at 14:58
    
True, but there are only a finite number of ways to write a get method for a nested vector, and the point was to get a data point for comparison and whether the suggested means of optimising the posted code was worthwhile. –  Pete Kirkham Sep 18 '09 at 15:04

There are far too many calculations in the inner loop:

  1. For the descriptive statistics (mean, standard deviation) the only thing required is to compute the sum of value and the sum of squared value. From these two sums the mean and standard deviation can be computed after the outer loop (together with a third value, the number of samples - n is your new/updated code). The equations can be derived from the definitions or found on the web, e.g. Wikipedia. For instance the mean is just sum of value divided by n. For the n version (in contrast to the n-1 version - however n is large in this case so it doesn't matter which one is used) the standard deviation is:
    sqrt( n * sumOfSquaredValue - sumOfValue * sumOfValue).

    Thus only two floating point additions and one multiplication are needed in the inner loop. Overflow is not a problem with these sums as the range for doubles is 10^318. In particular you will get rid of the expensive floating point division that the profiling reported in another answer has revealed.

  2. A lesser problem is that the minimum and maximum are rewritten every time (the compiler may or may not prevent this). As the minimum quickly becomes small and the maximum quickly becomes large, only the two comparisons should happen for the majority of loop iterations: use if statements instead to be sure. It can be argued, but on the other hand it is trivial to do.

share|improve this answer
    
special +1 for spotting unconditional update of min and max. The rest is valid, but has already been pointed to this way or another. –  Michael Krelin - hacker Sep 18 '09 at 22:21
    
Overflow is not a problem with these sums as the range for doubles is 10^318. Only because it sacrifices less significant bits to make room for more significant bits. –  Robert L Sep 19 '09 at 1:28
    
@Robert L: it is correct that the current code has less round-off error than using the two sums proposed in my answer. The question is wether this increased round-off error is significant or not - given the number of samples, typical values of those samples and accuracy requirements for the final result (mean and standard deviation). –  Peter Mortensen Sep 19 '09 at 11:01
    
Note for self: Forth simulation. –  Peter Mortensen May 15 '11 at 7:52

I would change how I access the data. Assuming you are using std::vector for your container you could do something like this:

vector<vector<T> >::const_iterator row;
vector<vector<T> >::const_iterator row_end = vals.end();
for(row = vals.begin(); row < row_end; ++row)
{
    vector<T>::const_iterator value;
    vector<T>::const_iterator value_end = row->end();
    for(value = row->begin(); value < value_end; ++value)
    {
        double mean_prev = new_mean;
        new_mean += (*value - new_mean) / (cnt + 1);
        new_standard_dev += (*value - new_mean) * (*value - mean_prev);

        // find new max/min's
        new_min = min(*value, new_min);
        new_max = max(*value, new_max);
        cnt++;
    }
}

The advantage of this is that in your inner loop you aren't consulting the outter vector, just the inner one.

If you container type is a list, this will be significantly faster. Because the look up time of get/operator[] is linear for a list and constant for a vector.

Edit, I moved the call to end() out of the loop.

share|improve this answer
    
Bad thing here is calling end() functions in the loop. –  Michael Krelin - hacker Sep 18 '09 at 14:08
    
took my downvote back ;-) Now your answer looks more or less like mine ;-) –  Michael Krelin - hacker Sep 18 '09 at 14:38

Move the .size() calls to before each loop, and make sure you are compiling with optimizations turned on.

share|improve this answer
    
I wish I could vote this one up more times. –  Tim Sep 18 '09 at 13:48
    
tim, you can, because almost every answer suggests that ;-) –  Michael Krelin - hacker Sep 18 '09 at 14:03
    
Well, I actually think the big-win would be just optimizations. Noone mentioned that, but that has made a HUGE difference in my own code, and the side effect is that both size() and at() will probably be optimized out of the loop automatically anyway. –  Jim Buck Sep 18 '09 at 14:57
    
not likely, Jim. Those two can't really be optimized out by compiler. –  Michael Krelin - hacker Sep 19 '09 at 17:33

If your matrix is stored as a vector of vectors, then in the outer for loop you should directly retrieve the i-th vector, and then operate on that in the inner loop. Try that and see if it improves performance.

share|improve this answer

I'm nor sure of what type vals is but vals.at(row).size() could take a long time if itself iterates through the collection. Store that value in a variable. Otherwise it could make the algorithm more like O(n³) than O(n²)

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1  
std::vector::size() has complexity O(1), as well as std::vector::at(). –  Kirill V. Lyadvinsky Sep 18 '09 at 13:39
    
Thanks, wasn't sure if he used std::vector. –  Tobias Sep 21 '09 at 10:55

I think that I would rewrite it to use const iterators instead of row and col indexes. I would set up a const const_iterator for row_end and col_end to compare against, just to make certain it wasn't making function calls at every loop end.

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As people have mentioned, it might be get(). If it accesses neighbors, for instance, you will totally smash the cache which will greatly reduce the performance. You should profile, or just think about access patterns.

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Coming a bit late to the party here, but a couple of points:

  1. You're effectively doing numerical work here. I don't know much about numerical algorithms, but I know enough to know that references and expert support are often useful. This discussion thread offers some references; and Numerical Recipes is a standard (if dated) work.

  2. If you have the opportunity to redesign your matrix, you want to try using a valarray and slices instead of vectors of vectors; one advantage that immediately comes to mind is that you're guaranteed a flat linear layout, which makes cache pre-fetching and SIMD instructions (if your compiler can use them) more effective.

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In the inner loop, you shouldn't be testing size, you shouldn't be doing any divisions, and iterators can also be costly. In fact, some unrolling would be good in there. And, of course, you should pay attention to cache locality.

If you get the loop overhead low enough, it might make sense to do it in separate passes: one to get the sum (which you divide to get the mean), one to get the sum of squares (which you combine with the sum to get the variance), and one to get the min and/or max. The reason is to simplify what is in the inner unrolled loop so the compiler can keep stuff in registers.

I couldn't get the code to compile, so I couldn't pinpoint issues for sure.

share|improve this answer

I have modified the algorithm to get rid of almost all of the floating-point division.

WARNING: UNTESTED CODE!!!

void CalculateStats()
{
    //OHGOD

    double accum_f;
    double accum_sq_f;
    double new_mean = 0;
    double new_standard_dev = 0;

    int new_min = 256;
    int new_max = 0;

    const int oku = 100000000;
    int accum_ichi = 0;
    int accum_oku = 0;
    int accum_sq_ichi = 0;
    int accum_sq_oku = 0;

    size_t cnt = 0;
    int v1 = 0;
    int v2 = 0;

    v1 = vals.size();

    for(size_t row = 0; row < v1; row++)
    {

            v2 = vals.at(row).size();
            for(size_t col = 0; col < v2; col++)
            {
                    T value = get(row, col);
                    int accum_ichi += value;
                    int accum_sq_ichi += (value * value);

                    // perform carries
                    accum_oku += (accum_ichi / oku);
                    accum_ichi %= oku;
                    accum_sq_oku += (accum_sq_ichi / oku);
                    accum_sq_ichi %= oku;

                    // find new max/min's
                    new_min = value < new_min ? value : new_min;
                    new_max = value > new_max ? value : new_max;
                    cnt++;
            }
    }

    // now, and only now, do we use floating-point arithmetic
    accum_f = (double)(oku) * (double)(accum_oku) + (double)(accum_ichi);
    accum_sq_f = (double)(oku) * (double)(accum_sq_oku) + (double)(accum_sq_ichi);

    new_mean = accum_f / (double)(cnt);

    // standard deviation formula from Wikipedia
    stats_standard_dev = sqrt((double)(cnt)*accum_sq_f - accum_f*accum_f)/(double)(cnt);        

    std::cout << stats_standard_dev << std::endl;
}
share|improve this answer
    
@Robert: don’t use HTML, use Markdown for formatting and save yourself a lot of trouble. –  Konrad Rudolph Sep 19 '09 at 14:51
    
@Konrad: i tried that and it didn't work. I wish there were no formatting since all the formatting characters are ones that I need for my code. –  Robert L Sep 20 '09 at 2:14

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