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I need help assigning a value to an array with in a structure. Your help is greatly appreciated:

typedef struct _temp_t {
     int16_t _values[4];
} TEMP_T;

void func() {
    TEMP_T *temps;
    int x = 5;

    temps._values[0] = x;
}

I'm getting an error :

 ...src/rodm/ucdCom.c:512: error: request for member '_values' in something not a structure or union

Your help is greatly appreciated!

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revise the c pointers –  Arpit Jan 21 '13 at 19:13
1  
@Aniket I've a feeling that will be proclaimed again without at least one allocation call in there somewhere. –  WhozCraig Jan 21 '13 at 19:14
    
Gotta dereference that pointer... –  user529758 Jan 21 '13 at 19:16
2  
"Your help is greatly appreciated!" - just apparently never acknowledged. Dude, LRN2 accept answers to your questions. –  WhozCraig Jan 21 '13 at 19:16
1  
@Aniket And because he apparently haven't made the effort to learn about the topic he wants to be involved in... Things like this should be in any decent C tutorial. –  user529758 Jan 21 '13 at 19:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted
TEMP_T *temps;

temps is a pointer, so it has no members, only structs and unions have members.

After you allocated memory for temps, you could set

temps->_values[0] = x;

Or you can declare temps as a TEMP_T,

TEMP_T temps;

and leave the rest of the code as is.

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TEMP_T *temps;

Drop the * from that line. Then it will be a true TEMP_T object instead of a pointer.

Alternatively, malloc some memory to temps and then use:

temps->_values[0] = x;
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2  
+1 for both of you anyways... you know, for compensation... –  user529758 Jan 21 '13 at 19:18
    
Ditto. what he said =P –  WhozCraig Jan 21 '13 at 19:21

The OP didn't have any sign of an allocated struct TEMPT_T anywhere.

He had a pointer, but nothing for it to point to. His code then attempts an assignment with member access syntax (temps._values[0];), as opposed to pointer access syntax (temps->_values[0];).

A slightly better version of his code might look like:

typedef struct _temp_t {
    int16_t _values[4];
} TEMP_T;

void func(struct TEMPT_T in) {
    TEMP_T *temps = ∈
    int x = 5;

    temps->_values[0] = x;
}

The function's new definition implies that a struct TEMP_T must exist for it to be used, and thus the pointer access into the structure becomes legal.

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