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I'm attempting to construct and execute a csh script from python.

The code I have produces what looks like a correct script, and os.system("my_script.csh") returns '0', but the script doesn't perform the task within it unless I go into it manually using vim and re-save it (changing nothing in the script manually - i don't even enter 'insert' mode). What is it that re-saving in vim does that isn't being done in my code, and is it possible to do it?

Here's the relevant part of my code:

grabmeName = '%sgrabme%s.csh'%(dirNames['grabmes'],uniqID)
if not os.path.exists(grabmeName):
    open(grabmeName,'w').close()
    os.chmod(grabmeName,0777)
    with open(grabmeName,'a') as f:
        f.write("#!/bin/csh -f\n")
        f.write("echo 'hello'")
    os.system(grabmeName)
share|improve this question
    
You seem to have an indentation error. Could you please check your code and make sure that the indention you have here is exactly like it is in your code? I can think of at least one scenario that could lead the the behaviour you see depending on indentation. . . –  mgilson Jan 21 '13 at 19:19
    
Thanks, it was a typo here. Editted. –  user1824335 Jan 21 '13 at 19:28
    
why open the file for 'a'ppend and not 'w'rite ? –  sotapme Jan 21 '13 at 19:41
    
I didn't know what effect opening it as 'w' would have on the permissions so decided to play it safe. –  user1824335 Jan 22 '13 at 12:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The main problem is that every line in the shell needs to end with a \n in order to be executed, even the last line. You can just add \n to the end of the "echo 'hello'" string. This is arguably a bug in csh, since bash and friends don’t have this problem, but if you want to use csh, you’ll have to accommodate it.

When you save a text file in vim, it adds a trailing newline to the file if there wasn’t one to begin with. You can verify this by saving a copy of the file beforehand and running diff to see what vim changes:

$ cat blah-grabme-12.csh 
#!/bin/csh -f
echo 'hello'$ cp blah-grabme-12.csh blah-grabme-12.csh.orig
$ vim blah-grabme-12.csh
┌────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────┐
│#!/bin/csh -f                                                                   │
│echo 'hello'                                                                    │
│~                                                                               │
│~                                                                               │
│~                                                                               │
│~                                                                               │
│~                                                                               │
│~                                                                               │
│~                                                                               │
│~                                                                               │
│~                                                                               │
│~                                                                               │
│~                                                                               │
│~                                                                               │
│~                                                                               │
│~                                                                               │
│~                                                                               │
│~                                                                               │
│~                                                                               │
│~                                                                               │
│~                                                                               │
│~                                                                               │
│~                                                                               │
│:wq❚                                                                            │
└────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────┘
$ diff -u blah-grabme-12.csh.orig blah-grabme-12.csh.orig
--- blah-grabme-12.csh.orig
+++ blah-grabme-12.csh
@@ -1,2 +1,2 @@
 #!/bin/csh -f
-echo 'hello'
\ No newline at end of file
+echo 'hello'

You can turn off this behaviour of vim in your ~/.vimrc if you'd like. See :help 'eol' in vim help.

Another potential problem is that system(filename) will only work if filename is a non-bare path—i.e., has a / in it—or if . is in the system $PATH.

Additionally, by using os.open() instead of open(), you can set the file permissions at file creation time. Here it might not make a big difference, but in many contexts, creating the file and then changing its permissions results in a security vulnerability. This stackoverflow question shows how to do that.


Putting it all together, you’d get something like this:

import os
import os.path

grabmeName = 'blah-grabme-12.csh'

with os.fdopen(os.open(grabmeName, os.O_WRONLY | os.O_CREAT, 0700), 'w') as f:
    f.write("#!/bin/csh -f\n")
    f.write("echo 'hello'\n")
os.system(os.path.abspath(grabmeName))
share|improve this answer
    
That's brilliant, thank you. How does your version test whether the file exists? I take it that the os.O_WRONLY | os.O_CREATpart does this, but your script would run the command even if it has been created before. I need to test whether it exists first as I am running multiple instances of this script and don't want to re-run the command unnecessarily. –  user1824335 Jan 22 '13 at 12:14
    
Thanks, glad you like it! You can just put the if not os.path.exists(grabmeName): line back. I took that out because it made repeated testing of the script annoying: I’d change the Python script, but it would run an old version of the shell script… –  andrewdotn Jan 22 '13 at 16:34

You should checkout subprocess it shows many examples.

output=`mycmd myarg`
# becomes
output = check_output(["mycmd", "myarg"])

As you want to capture the output from the command and not just the return status.

share|improve this answer
    
The script that I actually run is a little more involved (though the problem still occurs with the echo 'hello'command in the question) - and I would like to save it as an independently executable file, so that it can be re-run as and when needed. –  user1824335 Jan 21 '13 at 19:32
    
I though that you wanted to dynamically create a script, run it and capture it's output. I've had it before where a script has DOS line endings which stops it running which may be why the into vim and out corrects the line endings. Check with od -c before and after. –  sotapme Jan 21 '13 at 19:37
    
The script I have saves its output on to the file system, so I don't need the output - I only mentioned it to assert that the script was being executed. –  user1824335 Jan 22 '13 at 12:21

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