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Basically, the outcome I am attempting is: "get the number of successful records that have 0 unsuccessful records within a certain amount of time into the past". "successful" and "unsuccessful" just refer to a column's value.

Although it's a little more complicated, here's the description of the table I'm dealing with:

`log`
  id                int PRIMARY KEY AUTO_INCREMENT
  fingerprint_id    int (foreign key)
  status            boolean
  date              timestamp

The workflow of the little system we have is that when a user swipes their fingerprint, a record is added to this table and status is set based on whether it matched (again, there's more to it, I'm just trying to simplify). We get the fingerprint_id based on the user doing this, so that is the identifier for relating records to a person.

Right now, we require them to attempt it at most 3 times. So, they can match on the 1st of 3, 2nd of 3, 3rd of 3, or not at all. And that means they can have 1, 2, or 3 records in their "group". Although it's not true, we can assume that a user will continue trying until they match or reach 3 failed attempts (we have found that sometimes people don't continue after failing once or twice, possibly).

Here's an example of some data:

id  fp_id status   date
----------------------------------------
20    2     0      '2013-01-21 12:30:01'
21    2     0      '2013-01-21 12:30:05'
22    2     0      '2013-01-21 12:30:10'
23    9     1      '2013-01-21 12:31:30'
24    1     0      '2013-01-21 12:35:00'
25    1     1      '2013-01-21 12:35:05'

In the data, user (fingerprint_id) 2 tried 3 times and never matched. User 9 matched on their first attempt. User 1 tried once and failed, then tried again and matched.

The point is to find out how many successful (status=1) log records have 0 unsuccessful (status=0) records within 35 seconds ago. Of course, the only way to "connect" them is by fingerprint_id.

Again, we're assuming a lot of things, but that's fine.

Here's my attempts:

SELECT  COUNT(*)
FROM    log AS log_main
WHERE   log_main.status=1 AND
        (SELECT COUNT(*)
         FROM   log AS log_inner
         WHERE  log_inner.fingerprint_id=log_main.fingerprint_id AND
                log_inner.status=0 AND
                log_inner.date<log_main.date AND log_inner.date>=(log_main.date - INTERVAL 35 SECOND))=0

^ I would expect this one to select all successful records that have a count of 0 unsuccessful records that occurred within 35 seconds ago (for that user). But I wouldn't know, because the query takes over 600 seconds. I just found out how to extend MySQL Workbench's max timeout, but either way, it's taking a really long time. The table has around 120,000 records total, so I'm not sure if that's enough to make this query that slow.

Anyways, here's another attempt:

SELECT  COUNT(*)
FROM    (SELECT log.fingerprint_id, log.date
         FROM log
         WHERE log.status=1) successful,
        (SELECT log.fingerprint_id, log.date
         FROM log
         WHERE log.status=0) unsuccessful
WHERE   successful.fingerprint_id=unsuccessful.fingerprint_id AND
        unsuccessful.date<successful.date AND unsuccessful.date>=(successful.date - INTERVAL 35 SECOND)

^ I feel like this one is closer, but of course, there is no comparison on a "count" of how many records matched in the past. That's the part I'm getting confused about how to solve. I have a feeling it has to do with GROUP BY or instead using IN, but what I've done just doesn't seem to work (in the sense that it goes over 600 seconds or something like that). Here's an example of something I've tried with GROUP BY

SELECT  successful.id, COUNT(*) cnt
FROM    (SELECT log.fingerprint_id, log.date, log.id
         FROM log
         WHERE log.status=1) successful,
        (SELECT log.fingerprint_id, log.date, log.id
         FROM log
         WHERE log.status=0) unsuccessful
WHERE   successful.fingerprint_id=unsuccessful.fingerprint_id AND
        unsuccessful.date<successful.date AND unsuccessful.date>=(successful.date - INTERVAL 35 SECOND)
GROUP BY successful.id

^ But the results only contain rows that have NOT 0 counts. And I'm guessing that's because of the WHERE clause. But I need ONLY the 0 counts.

I've tried so many combinations I think my brain is just fried.

share|improve this question
    
One point: Regarding the queries that are running so long, do you have the indexes you need those queries to have a chance to perform ok? –  DWright Jan 21 '13 at 20:12
    
@DWright I had a feeling that could be a problem. Unfortunately, we do not. Coincidentally, I am the one who decided to start cleaning up the database as I joined the team not too long ago, and already have queries ready to add the INDEXes. The problem is that I'm testing these queries on the production server (where the data really matters) and would rather wait until some downtime tonight to modify the table. To me, INDEXes make sense on the fingerprint_id and date columns. Would that probably be right? –  Ian Jan 21 '13 at 20:16

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try using NOT EXISTS instead of COUNT = 0. This should perform much better.

SELECT  COUNT(*)
FROM    log AS log_main
WHERE   log_main.status=1 
AND     NOT EXISTS
        (   SELECT 1
            FROM   log AS log_inner
            WHERE   log_inner.fingerprint_id=log_main.fingerprint_id
            AND     log_inner.status = 0
            AND     log_inner.date < log_main.date 
            AND     log_inner.date >= (log_main.date - INTERVAL 35 SECOND)
        );

You should also ensure the table is properly indexed.

EDIT

I believe using LEFT JOIN/IS NULL is more efficient in MySQL than using NOT EXISTS, so this will perform better than the above (although perhaps not significantly):

SELECT  COUNT(*)
FROM    log AS log_main
        LEFT JOIN log AS log_inner
            ON log_inner.fingerprint_id=log_main.fingerprint_id
            AND log_inner.status = 0
            AND log_inner.date < log_main.date 
            AND log_inner.date >= (log_main.date - INTERVAL 35 SECOND)
WHERE   log_main.status = 1 
AND     Log_inner.fingerprint_id IS NULL;

EDIT 2

To get records with 1 or 2 attempts etc I would still use a JOIN, but like so:

SELECT  COUNT(*)
FROM    (   SELECT  log_Main.id
            FROM    log AS log_main
                    INNER JOIN log AS log_inner
                        ON log_inner.fingerprint_id=log_main.fingerprint_id
                        AND log_inner.status = 0
                        AND log_inner.date < log_main.date 
                        AND log_inner.date >= (log_main.date - INTERVAL 35 SECOND)
            WHERE   log_main.status = 1 
            AND     Log_inner.fingerprint_id IS NULL
            GROUP BY log_Main.id
            HAVING COUNT(log_Inner.id) = 1
        ) d
share|improve this answer
    
Who knows if I ever tried that in the past. I will gladly give this a shot and let you know. Thanks for the suggestion! –  Ian Jan 21 '13 at 20:16
    
Yeah, brain's definitely fried. These make sense, so I hope they work (better)! –  Ian Jan 21 '13 at 20:19
    
So it took over 2000 seconds, but it seems to work. I'll probably have to tweak it because there are some weird scenarios...anyways, this seems right! I hate to ask, but could you help me with one more thing? I know in my question, I asked how to get records have that 0 related records...and you gave me the answer...but is there a way to do something similar to your solutions to match a record that has 1, or 2, related records? Instead of 0? I know it's easier with 0 because you can check for non-existence, but I'm also looking for a specific number of records too. Specifically, 1, and also 2 –  Ian Jan 21 '13 at 22:27

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