Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

What is the most efficient way to groupby objects in an array?

For example, given this array of objects:

[ 
    { Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 1", Task: "Task 1", Value: "5" },
    { Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 1", Task: "Task 2", Value: "10" },
    { Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 2", Task: "Task 1", Value: "15" },
    { Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 2", Task: "Task 2", Value: "20" },
    { Phase: "Phase 2", Step: "Step 1", Task: "Task 1", Value: "25" },
    { Phase: "Phase 2", Step: "Step 1", Task: "Task 2", Value: "30" },
    { Phase: "Phase 2", Step: "Step 2", Task: "Task 1", Value: "35" },
    { Phase: "Phase 2", Step: "Step 2", Task: "Task 2", Value: "40" }
]

I'm displaying this information in a table. I'd like to groupby different methods, but I want to sum the values.

I'm using underscore.js for its groupby function, which is helpful, but doesn't do the whole trick, because I don't want them "split up" but "merged", more like the SQL group-by method.

What I'm looking for would be able to total specific values (if requested).

So if I did groupby Phase, I'd want to receive:

[
    { Phase: "Phase 1", Value: 50 },
    { Phase: "Phase 2", Value: 130 }
]

And if I did groupy Phase / Step, I'd receive:

[
    { Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 1", Value: 15 },
    { Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 2", Value: 35 },
    { Phase: "Phase 2", Step: "Step 1", Value: 55 },
    { Phase: "Phase 2", Step: "Step 2", Value: 75 }
]

Is there a helpful script for this, or should I stick to using underscore.js, and then looping through the resulting object to do the totals myself?

share|improve this question
1  
What do you mean with efficient? Efficient in terms of fastest code or in terms of shortest, elegant code? What amount of data are we talink about? Are you operation on client or server? – try-catch-finally Jan 21 '13 at 21:06
up vote 28 down vote accepted

Although the linq answer is interesting, it's also quite heavy-weight. My approach is somewhat different:

var DataGrouper = (function() {
    var has = function(obj, target) {
        return _.any(obj, function(value) {
            return _.isEqual(value, target);
        });
    };

    var keys = function(data, names) {
        return _.reduce(data, function(memo, item) {
            var key = _.pick(item, names);
            if (!has(memo, key)) {
                memo.push(key);
            }
            return memo;
        }, []);
    };

    var group = function(data, names) {
        var stems = keys(data, names);
        return _.map(stems, function(stem) {
            return {
                key: stem,
                vals:_.map(_.where(data, stem), function(item) {
                    return _.omit(item, names);
                })
            };
        });
    };

    group.register = function(name, converter) {
        return group[name] = function(data, names) {
            return _.map(group(data, names), converter);
        };
    };

    return group;
}());

DataGrouper.register("sum", function(item) {
    return _.extend({}, item.key, {Value: _.reduce(item.vals, function(memo, node) {
        return memo + Number(node.Value);
    }, 0)});
});

You can see it in action on JSBin.

I didn't see anything in Underscore that does what has does, although I might be missing it. It's much the same as _.contains, but uses _.isEqual rather than === for comparisons. Other than that, the rest of this is problem-specific, although with an attempt to be generic.

Now DataGrouper.sum(data, ["Phase"]) returns

[
    {Phase: "Phase 1", Value: 50},
    {Phase: "Phase 2", Value: 130}
]

And DataGrouper.sum(data, ["Phase", "Step"]) returns

[
    {Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 1", Value: 15},
    {Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 2", Value: 35},
    {Phase: "Phase 2", Step: "Step 1", Value: 55},
    {Phase: "Phase 2", Step: "Step 2", Value: 75}
]

But sum is only one potential function here. You can register others as you like:

DataGrouper.register("max", function(item) {
    return _.extend({}, item.key, {Max: _.reduce(item.vals, function(memo, node) {
        return Math.max(memo, Number(node.Value));
    }, Number.NEGATIVE_INFINITY)});
});

and now DataGrouper.max(data, ["Phase", "Step"]) will return

[
    {Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 1", Max: 10},
    {Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 2", Max: 20},
    {Phase: "Phase 2", Step: "Step 1", Max: 30},
    {Phase: "Phase 2", Step: "Step 2", Max: 40}
]

or if you registered this:

DataGrouper.register("tasks", function(item) {
    return _.extend({}, item.key, {Tasks: _.map(item.vals, function(item) {
      return item.Task + " (" + item.Value + ")";
    }).join(", ")});
});

then calling DataGrouper.tasks(data, ["Phase", "Step"]) will get you

[
    {Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 1", Tasks: "Task 1 (5), Task 2 (10)"},
    {Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 2", Tasks: "Task 1 (15), Task 2 (20)"},
    {Phase: "Phase 2", Step: "Step 1", Tasks: "Task 1 (25), Task 2 (30)"},
    {Phase: "Phase 2", Step: "Step 2", Tasks: "Task 1 (35), Task 2 (40)"}
]

DataGrouper itself is a function. You can call it with your data and a list of the properties you want to group by. It returns an array whose elements are object with two properties: key is the collection of grouped properties, vals is an array of objects containing the remaining properties not in the key. For example, DataGrouper(data, ["Phase", "Step"]) will yield:

[
    {
        "key": {Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 1"},
        "vals": [
            {Task: "Task 1", Value: "5"},
            {Task: "Task 2", Value": "10"}
        ]
    },
    {
        "key": {Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 2"},
        "vals": [
            {Task: "Task 1", Value: "15"}, 
            {Task: "Task 2", Value: "20"}
        ]
    },
    {
        "key": {Phase: "Phase 2", Step: "Step 1"},
        "vals": [
            {Task: "Task 1", Value: "25"},
            {Task: "Task 2", Value: "30"}
        ]
    },
    {
        "key": {Phase: "Phase 2", Step: "Step 2"},
        "vals": [
            {Task: "Task 1", Value: "35"}, 
            {Task: "Task 2", Value: "40"}
        ]
    }
]

DataGrouper.register accepts a function and creates a new function which accepts the initial data and the properties to group by. This new function then takes the output format as above and runs your function against each of them in turn, returning a new array. The function that's generated is stored as a property of DataGrouper according to a name you supply and also returned if you just want a local reference.

Well that's a lot of explanation. The code is reasonably straightforward, I hope!

share|improve this answer
    
This is perfect! Thank you. I was also thinking that linq.js was a bit heavy for the small amount that I would be using it for. – Rail24 Jan 23 '13 at 17:42
1  
You might be getting some additional answers. I sent this as an interesting problem to a JS users group I help run. I don't know if any of them might find some different approaches. – Scott Sauyet Jan 23 '13 at 18:11
    
I would not mind that at all! – Rail24 Jan 23 '13 at 19:26

This is probably more easily done with linq.js, which is intended to be a true implementation of LINQ in JavaScript (DEMO):

var linq = Enumerable.From(data);
var result =
    linq.GroupBy(function(x){ return x.Phase; })
        .Select(function(x){
          return {
            Phase: x.Key(),
            Value: x.Sum(function(y){ return y.Value|0; })
          };
        }).ToArray();

result:

[
    { Phase: "Phase 1", Value: 50 },
    { Phase: "Phase 2", Value: 130 }
]

Or, more simply using the string-based selectors (DEMO):

linq.GroupBy("$.Phase", "",
    "k,e => { Phase:k, Value:e.Sum('$.Value|0') }").ToArray();
share|improve this answer
1  
Holy moly. Is there nothing javscript can't do? – Stephen Byrne Jan 22 '13 at 0:09
10  
Pretty much, no, unless you're talking crazy talk. – Scott Sauyet Jan 22 '13 at 12:59
    
can we use multiple properties while grouping here: GroupBy(function(x){ return x.Phase; }) – Amit Dec 16 '15 at 21:09
_.groupBy([{tipo: 'A' },{tipo: 'A'}, {tipo: 'B'}], 'tipo');
>> Object {A: Array[2], B: Array[1]}

From: http://underscorejs.org/#groupBy

share|improve this answer

i'd like to suggest my approach. First, separate grouping and aggregating. Lets declare prototypical "group by" function. It takes another function to produce "hash" string for array element.

Array.prototype.groupBy = function(hash){
  var _hash = hash ? hash : function(o){return o;};

  var _map = {};
  var put = function(map, key, value){
    if (!map[_hash(key)]) {
        map[_hash(key)] = {};
        map[_hash(key)].group = [];
        map[_hash(key)].key = key;

    }
    map[_hash(key)].group.push(value); 
  }

  this.map(function(obj){
    put(_map, obj, obj);
  });

  return Object.keys(_map).map(function(key){
    return {key: _map[key].key, group: _map[key].group};
  });
}

when gouping is done you can aggregate data how you need, in your case

data.groupBy(function(o){return JSON.stringify({a: o.Phase, b: o.Step});})
    /* aggreagating */
    .map(function(el){ 
         var sum = el.group.reduce(
           function(l,c){
             return l + parseInt(c.Value);
           },
           0
         );
         el.key.Value = sum; 
         return el.key;
    });

in common it works. i have tested this code in chrome console. and feel free to improve and find mistakes ;)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks ! Love the approach, and suits my needs perfectly (I don't need aggregating). – aberaud Mar 2 '14 at 1:13
    
I think you want to change your line in put(): map[_hash(key)].key = key; to map[_hash(key)].key = _hash(key);. – Scotty.NET Mar 3 '15 at 13:46

You can do it with Alasql JavaScript library:

var data = [ { Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 1", Task: "Task 1", Value: "5" },
             { Phase: "Phase 1", Step: "Step 1", Task: "Task 2", Value: "10" }];

var res = alasql('SELECT Phase, Step, SUM(CAST([Value] AS INT)) AS [Value] \
                  FROM ? GROUP BY Phase, Step',[data]);

Try this example at jsFiddle.

BTW: On large arrays (100000 records and more) Alasql faster tham Linq. See test at jsPref.

Comments:

  • Here I put Value in square brackets, because VALUE is a keyword in SQL
  • I have to use CAST() function to convert string Values to number type.
share|improve this answer
1  
Just tried this on a problem I had to summarise a query and sum parts of it - amazing - Works brilliantly - well done and thanks Agershun for a brilliant library. – John Lucas Apr 22 '15 at 10:47
Array.prototype.groupBy = function(keyFunction) {
    var groups = {};
    this.forEach(function(el) {
        var key = keyFunction(el);
        if (key in groups == false) {
            groups[key] = [];
        }
        groups[key].push(el);
    });
    return Object.keys(groups).map(function(key) {
        return {
            key: key,
            values: groups[key]
        };
    });
};
share|improve this answer

If you want to avoid external libraries, you can concisely implement a vanilla version of groupBy() like so:

var groupBy = function(xs, key) {
  return xs.reduce(function(rv, x) {
    (rv[x[key]] = rv[x[key]] || []).push(x);
    return rv;
  }, {});
};
console.log(groupBy(['one', 'two', 'three'], 'length'));
// => {3: ["one", "two"], 5: ["three"]}
share|improve this answer

I borrowed this method from underscore.js fiddler

window.helpers=(function (){
    var lookupIterator = function(value) {
        if (value == null){
            return function(value) {
                return value;
            };
        }
        if (typeof value === 'function'){
                return value;
        }
        return function(obj) {
            return obj[value];
        };
    },
    each = function(obj, iterator, context) {
        var breaker = {};
        if (obj == null) return obj;
        if (Array.prototype.forEach && obj.forEach === Array.prototype.forEach) {
            obj.forEach(iterator, context);
        } else if (obj.length === +obj.length) {
            for (var i = 0, length = obj.length; i < length; i++) {
                if (iterator.call(context, obj[i], i, obj) === breaker) return;
            }
        } else {
            var keys = []
            for (var key in obj) if (Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty.call(obj, key)) keys.push(key)
            for (var i = 0, length = keys.length; i < length; i++) {
                if (iterator.call(context, obj[keys[i]], keys[i], obj) === breaker) return;
            }
        }
        return obj;
    },
    // An internal function used for aggregate "group by" operations.
    group = function(behavior) {
        return function(obj, iterator, context) {
            var result = {};
            iterator = lookupIterator(iterator);
            each(obj, function(value, index) {
                var key = iterator.call(context, value, index, obj);
                behavior(result, key, value);
            });
            return result;
        };
    };

    return {
      groupBy : group(function(result, key, value) {
        Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty.call(result, key) ? result[key].push(value) :              result[key] = [value];
        })
    };
})();

var arr=[{a:1,b:2},{a:1,b:3},{a:1,b:1},{a:1,b:2},{a:1,b:3}];
 console.dir(helpers.groupBy(arr,"b"));
 console.dir(helpers.groupBy(arr,function (el){
   return el.b>2;
 }));
share|improve this answer

I would check lodash groupBy is seems to do exactly what you are asking for. It is also quite lightweight and really simple.

Fiddle example: https://jsfiddle.net/r7szvt5k/

Provided that your array name is arr the groupBy with lodash is just:

var a = _.groupBy(arr, function(n) {
  return n.Phase;
});
// a is your array grouped by Phase attribute
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.