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I'd like to achieve a custom-colored shape like this using no Javascript: 3 corner rounded triangle

Currently I'm overlaying an image of the 'frame' over an orange rectangular div, but this is pretty hacky. I suppose I could use a dynamically generated canvas element, but that not only requires JS, but HTML5 canvas support. Any ideas?

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+1 Interesting challenge! Yeah, you can do it using just CSS. I'll make a demo :) –  Ana Jan 21 '13 at 21:39

4 Answers 4

up vote 26 down vote accepted

My best attempt: http://dabblet.com/gist/4592062 final

Pixel perfection at any size, uses simpler math than Ana's original solution, and is more intuitive in my opinion :)

.triangle,
.triangle:before,
.triangle:after {
    width:  10em;
    height: 10em;
    position: relative;
    background: orange;
    border-top-right-radius: 30%;
}
.triangle:before,
.triangle:after {
    content: '';
    position: absolute;
}

.triangle {
    transform: rotate(-60deg) skewX(-30deg) scale(1,.866);
}
.triangle:before {
    transform: rotate(-135deg) skewX(-45deg) scale(1.414,.707) translate(0,-50%);
}
.triangle:after {
    transform: rotate(135deg) skewY(-45deg) scale(.707,1.414) translate(50%);
}
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Really good one! –  Ana Jan 22 '13 at 14:39
    
How about an isosceles triangle, pointing left? Being the right side the largest. –  rubens.lopes Nov 20 at 0:38
    
Thanks much for this - I'm using it in a site of mine now. Just a heads up for future readers: if you use 'vmin' for sizing, it can end up looking a little skewed depending on the resulting px values. Not sure why, because if you manually type in those same px values, the triangle looks fine. Hopefully near-future browsers will render this comment obsolete! –  aaaaaa Nov 23 at 9:22

demo

The HTML is simply:

<div class='triangle'></div>

Relevant CSS:

.triangle, .triangle:before, .triangle:after { width: 4em; height: 4em; }
.triangle {
    overflow: hidden;
    position: relative;
    margin: 7em auto 0;
    border-radius: 20%;
    transform: translateY(50%) rotate(30deg) skewY(30deg) scaleX(.866);
    cursor: pointer;
    pointer-events: none;
} 
.triangle:before, .triangle:after {
    position: absolute;
    background: orange;
    pointer-events: auto;
    content: '';
}
.triangle:before {
    border-radius: 20% 20% 20% 53%;
    transform: scaleX(1.155) skewY(-30deg) rotate(-30deg) translateY(-42.3%) 
            skewX(30deg) scaleY(.866) translateX(-24%);
}
.triangle:after {
    border-radius: 20% 20% 53% 20%;
    transform: scaleX(1.155) skewY(-30deg) rotate(-30deg) translateY(-42.3%) 
            skewX(-30deg) scaleY(.866) translateX(24%);
}

The idea is really simple: you first apply a series of transforms to your .triangle element (which has overflow: hidden; - you can remove that to see what happens ;) ) in order to get a rhombus.

Then you apply the same transforms to the :before and :after pseudo-elements, plus a few more to make them rhomboidal as well.

And in the end, you have three rhombuses which intersect, the orange shape being their intersection. Hover the triangle to see the intersecting shapes ;)

It scales nicely, you just have to change the width and the height of the .triangle element.

For Firefox, Chrome and Safari, only the orange triangle with rounded corners is sensitive to hover (thanks to pointer-events: none; on the .triangle element and pointer-events: auto; on the pseudo-elements). Otherwise, this could be achieved by wrapping .triangle in an element having the same width and height (and the same border-radius) and overflow: hidden;.


Notes

  • You could also do it with CSS gradients. However, unlike 2D transforms, CSS gradients won't work in IE9.
  • I'd wish I didn't have to unskew the pseudo-elemets which inherit the skew from their parent only to skew them again after a rotation, but it doesn't seem to work otherwise.
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Awesome answer-- very clever! –  Murray Smith Jan 22 '13 at 3:53
    
The only issue is, at very large sizes and/or on certain screens, there are minor imperfections at both bottom corners; a result of the approximated radii, no doubt –  Murray Smith Jan 22 '13 at 5:08

Use an image of some sort. That's what images are for. If you need it to scale, SVG is a good choice, otherwise, just use a png as a background, or an <img> element if it's part of content.

If you absolutely must have it in a CSS file, you could try data: urls (not supported in IE7 and below).

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3  
+1 for suggesting SVG –  Ryan Artecona Jan 21 '13 at 20:35

Ana's answer inspired me to try another approach, one that's just as far from perfect, but is at least symmetrical. Here's a preview at real-size and blown up. It's simply a border-hack trangle wrapped in a clipping circle/border-radius:

Preview

And the code (adjust the overall size via single font-size property):

.triangle {
    font-size: .8em;
    position: relative;
    width: 3.8em;
    height: 3.8em;
    text-align: center;
    margin: 10% auto 0;
    overflow: hidden;
    border-radius: 100%;
} 
.triangle:before {
    content: '';
    position: absolute;
    width:0;
    height: 0;
    border: solid 2em transparent;
    border-bottom-color: orange;
    border-bottom-width: 3.2em;
    border-top-width: 0;
    margin: -.3em -2em;
}

Play with it here: http://dabblet.com/gist/4590714

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