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I am new to c++ . I was trying to write following code to fill up each byte of array with new values without overriding others. Each byte (r) below should be added up at new address of the array.

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
     char y[80] ;
     for(int b=0 ; b<10;++b)
        {
          strcpy_s(y"r");

        }
}

Please let me know if there is any function in c++ which can do that. In the above case i the value 'r' arbitrary and this can have any new value. So the resultant array of character should contain value rrrrr...10 times. Thanks a lot in advance for this.

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closed as not constructive by Lightness Races in Orbit, 0x499602D2, Nix, P.T., hjpotter92 Jan 22 '13 at 6:14

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4  
std::fill exists. –  Rapptz Jan 21 '13 at 20:41
    
does that code build? –  thang Jan 21 '13 at 20:46
    
If you are going to use C++, try to avoid standard C functions when there is a C++ alternative. strcpy is a C function, and strcpy_s is a proprietary extension and not portable. –  Zyx 2000 Jan 21 '13 at 22:36

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Using C++11

#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>

int main() {
    char array[80];
    std::fill(std::begin(array),std::begin(array)+10,'r');
}

Or, as mentioned in the comments you can use std::fill(array,array+10,'r').

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1  
What's the point of the std::begin? You can simply use array. –  Jack Aidley Jan 21 '13 at 20:46
1  
@JackAidley Out of habit now :( –  Rapptz Jan 21 '13 at 20:47
    
Out of idle interest, how does the performance of std::fill compare to memset? –  Jack Aidley Jan 21 '13 at 20:52
2  
@JackAidley compiling with -O2 and the ASM output is near identical –  Rapptz Jan 21 '13 at 20:59
2  
@JackAidley: Disagreeing is certainly your right, even though you're wrong. :) –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 21 '13 at 22:17

You can use the [] operator and assign a char value.

char y[80];
for(int b=0; b<10; ++b)
    y[b] = 'r';

And yes, std::fill is a more idiomatic and modern C++ way to do this, but you should know about the [] operator too!

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Option 1: Initialize the array while defining. Convenient for initializing only a small number of values. Advantage is that the array can be declared const (not shown here).

char const fc = 'r';   // fill char
char y[ 80 ] = { fc, fc, fc, fc,
                 fc, fc, fc, fc,
                 fc, fc };

Option 2: Classic C

memset( y, y+10, 'r' );

Option 3: Classic (pre-C++11) C++

std::fill( y, y+10, 'r' );
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1  
// ConsoleApp.cpp : Defines the entry point for the console application.
//

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

int fun(bool x,int y[],int length);
int funx(char y[]);
int functionx(bool IsMainProd, int MainProdId, int Addons[],int len);
int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    int AddonCancel[10];

    for( int i = 0 ; i<4 ;++i)
    {
        std::fill(std::begin(AddonCancel)+i,std::begin(AddonCancel)+i+1,i*5);
    }
    bool IsMainProduct (false);
    int MainProduct =4 ; 
    functionx(IsMainProduct,MainProduct,AddonCancel,4);

}

int functionx(bool IsMainProd, int MainProdId, int Addons[],int len)
{
    if(IsMainProd)
        std::cout<< "Is Main Product";
    else
    {
        for(int x = 0 ; x<len;++x)
        {
          std::cout<< Addons[x];
        }
    }

    return 0 ; 
}
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