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Is there any type of variable that allows me to increase its value, without the memorized value being overwritten? Example:

def main():
var = 0

  inc = input("Want to increase your variable?")
    if inc == "yes":
      var = var + 1
      main()
      #restart the script from the top
    if inc == "no":
      exit()

When the code restarts, the var will return to its value of "0" without having remembered that "var = var + 1" bit we did, is there any variable type that will update itself to match the changes made in the script?

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Python 2 or 3? In Python 2 you must use raw_input instead of input. And you MUST indent your code properly! It is NOT optional in Python. –  ThiefMaster Jan 21 '13 at 21:52
1  
What do you mean "When the code restarts?" Do you mean when the program is closed and reopened? Or when the main function is called recursively? –  David Robinson Jan 21 '13 at 21:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

When you run your function, main(), you're resetting var back to 0. Notice how it's inside the function, and so whatever is inside a function will be run.

Here var won't be changed to 0 every time:

var = 0
def main(number):
    print number
    inc = raw_input("Want to increase your variable?") # Or input() if python 3.x
    if inc == "yes":
        number += 1
        return main(number)
    if inc == "no":
        return number

var = main(var)
print var

var in this case is a global variable. It can be accessed throughout the whole code.

The code above, when run:

python file.py
0
Want to increase your variable?yes
1
Want to increase your variable?yes
2
Want to increase your variable?no
2 #result of printing var at the end

I hope this answered your problems. If you have any other questions, I'll try answer them ;). I'm a bit of a novice to python.

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When referring to the main(number) from another define it gives me "NameError: global name 'number' is not defined". This would be referring to it like this: def secondmain(): ans = raw_input("Want to goto the main code again?") if ans == "Yes": main(number) if ans == "No": exit() Sorry Im new, I have no clue have to put a code tag around that. –  Jordan ChillMcgee Ludgate Jan 21 '13 at 23:59
    
number is the parameter. When you call a function, you fill up the parameter with a value. So when you do main(), you have to put an argument/parameter: for example, main(4). –  TerryA Jan 22 '13 at 0:09
    
If you're still having trouble, here's a link to basic function help I found from docs.python: docs.python.org/release/1.5.1p1/tut/functions.html –  TerryA Jan 22 '13 at 0:11

If you mean that the value of var is not preserved across iterations, this has to do with your use of recursion in main(). It's completely unnecessary and is better replaced with iteration:

var = 0

while True:
   inc = input("Want to increase your variable?")
   if inc == "yes":
      var = var + 1
   else:
      break
   print(var)

If you mean that you want to preserve the value of var across the invocations of your entire script, you could use pickle:

import os, pickle

PERSIST_FILE = "persist.dat"
if os.path.exists(PERSIST_FILE):
   var = pickle.load(open(PERSIST_FILE, "rb"))
else:
   var = 0

while True:
   print(var)
   inc = input("Want to increase your variable?")
   if inc == "yes":
      var = var + 1
   else:
      break

pickle.dump(var, open(PERSIST_FILE, "wb"))
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Better use with instead of relying on the reference counting GC to close the file. The fact that the file will be closed immediately is specific to CPython and should not be relied upon. –  ThiefMaster Jan 21 '13 at 22:00

No - a variable's value will be altered when you change it as you expect, except with certain usage postfix increment, and even then that variable only holds it's "old" state for evaluations on THAT line.

Sounds like you need to make use of a "temp" variable. Though the displayed code doesn't really tell me anything, tbh.

UPDATE:

With edits to your question... I think you mean you want a global variable among functions, that DOES remember state between function calls.

This is a good source for how to make and use these global variables:

http://www.python-course.eu/global_vs_local_variables.php

DOUBLE UPDATE:

You may mean you want the variable to remember its state even if you close the program! In that case use pickle as another answer details.

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