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For quite a long time, I have been declaring resource folders for 4 different densities:

  • drawable-ldpi
  • drawable-mdpi
  • drawable-hdpi
  • drawable-xhdpi

In the layout's XML, I have been using fixed widths (while still density-independent) such as 128dp for those graphics.

However, when more and more large-screen phones, and especially tablets, were introduced, that approach did not work anymore. Although you provide density-independent resources this way, the layout will not look good on large screens.

This is why I think I need to add Dimension resources that depend on the screen size, for use in the XML layouts, e.g.:

  • values
  • values-w600dp
  • values-w720dp
  • values-w1024dp

But does that mean that I should drop supporting those 4 density containers? Or do I need to provide 16 resource folders, i.e. one for every combination of density and size?

I can't find any good help in the Android documentation as to this topic.

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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted
+25

drawables and layouts are different. To answer your question, should you stop support those densities. Yes, but you should still support xdpi and hdpi. Romain Guy recently said that modern devices like the Nexus 7 (at a tvpi) can scale the assets properly enough that mdpi isn't really needed. And nobody uses ldpi anymore. Last I looked is was less than 2% of the market.

About layouts. A Nexus 7 (1280x800 tvdpi) would use something from the values-w1024dp but still get assets from the drawable-hdpi folder. Those two aren't mutually exclusive. Something like a S3 would also pull from the values-w1024dp but use drawable-xdpi. You only need to provide an alternative layout if your use-case calls for it.

So do you need 16 different things? No. You do need xdpi & hdpi (if not mdpi). You may want to include alternative layouts for different sizes. You can be as specific as you want or as generic. Unless you're doing a hybrid app for both phone & tablet (7 & 10 in) you probably don't need a lot of xxxx-sizexxx folders.

In the layout's XML, I have been using fixed widths (while still density-independent) such as 128dp for those graphics.

This is probably a source of your issues. Your layouts should be as fluid as possible using wrap_content and match_parent. Fixed sizes should be reserved for padding around the sides and image where you know the size ahead of time. If you do this, your layout should look decent at any size from a small 320 x 200 to a GTV size.

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Thank you! Unfortunately, fluid layouts are not always possible. There are definitely some cases where you must use fixed (but density-independent) sizes. I thought I had to provide 16 (4x4) folders because if you use larger graphics in layout-w1024dp than in layout-720dp, while both devices can have xhdpi screens, the graphics for layout-w1024dp must definitely be larger, needn't they? –  Marco W. Jan 24 '13 at 3:27
1  
ok, well take what you want from it. I (and the Android engineering team) disagree with you. fixed sized layouts are not the norm and should be far and few in between. It sounds like you're trying to provide localization based upon screen size. I think you're making these issues way too complicated. –  user123321 Jan 24 '13 at 3:46
    
p.s. you do understand that the graphics in the xdpi folder are larger right? The ratios are 3,4,6,8. So images placed in the hdpi are 6/8 the pixel size of xdpi. When you code background="@drawable/myImage" Android will automatically choose the proper dpi image for you thus eliminating the need to define different layouts just to get different assets. The only time you'd do that is for localizations (or if you REAAALLY wanted a different experience per screen size) –  user123321 Jan 24 '13 at 4:23
    
No, I don't want to do localization, and yes, of course, I understand the density-specific folders (ldpi to xhdpi). But as I wrote, when two screens are both xhdpi and the one requests the layout layout-w1024dp (because it's larger) and the other one requests layout-640dp (because it's smaller, but still xhdpi), then they can't just both use Drawables from xhdpi folder, because due to the different layout, the first screen needs much larger Drawables (while still of the same density). –  Marco W. Jan 24 '13 at 12:29
1  
@MarcoW.: "Unfortunately, fluid layouts are not always possible. There are definitely some cases where you must use fixed (but density-independent) sizes" -- perhaps you should be opening a new SO question, where you describe such layouts, so you can be shown how to make them fluid, or at least responsive. –  CommonsWare Jan 27 '13 at 20:19
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1) Regarding dimensions in your layouts (values/dimens.xml):

values values-w600dp values-w720dp values-w1024dp

But does that mean that I should drop supporting those 4 density containers? Or do I need to provide 16 resource folders, i.e. one for every combination of density and size?

No, you don't need to provide different dimensions per dpi bucket (hdpi/xhdpi), because the dimensions are already being scaled up or down based on the device (if you're using dp instead of px). So for dimensions, you only need to provide values for devices with different sizes (hence the name, values-smallest possible width-600-dp). Because you don't want 16dp padding on a phone AND 16dp on a 10" tablet as well. You'd want 64dp instead. And no, it doesn't matter what density the device has. It still needs to have the same padding on the respective device width. So for dimens, you only need to think about the device's actual physical dimensions.

2) Regarding drawables scaling for different resolutions (drawables/xdpi): The system scales them appropriately for the device. You don't need to worry about this. Also, you don't need to add any other buckets here. Just use mdpi/hdpi/xhdpi and maybe xxhdpi because many new devices are going to use the new density in the future.

Conclusion: there are 2 different UI building components that vary according to 2 different rules: drawables based on screen density and dimensions based on screen size. Do not mistake one for the other and think you need tens of buckets in the values folder, because that's not only wrong, it's just mind boggling.

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Thank you! If it is that easy, it's great :) But I thought it could be more difficult, actually. Let me explain my example one more time: An old device has xhdpi but only say 480x800 pixels. A brand-new tablet has xhdpi as well, but a screen resolution of 2560x1600. So you think that they can both use the xhdpi graphics and scale them smoothly? –  Marco W. Jan 25 '13 at 16:41
    
I do understand your issue. If you want to add a background drawable for both devices with a resolution of 480x800, then it would be stretched on the tablet. But this is not a new issue. This was also present in the past, but not on this large of a scale. So you could just do what you did in the past (add the drawable for the largest resolution, then let the system down-scale it); or just add drawables-xhdpi-sw600dp besides the usual buckets. But you still don't need tens of buckets; also mixed up with dimens. It's stil pretty manageable. –  Andrew Jan 26 '13 at 9:44
    
Yes, exactly, drawables-xhdpi-sw600dp. And this is what leads to tens of folders if you put that into practice consequently. –  Marco W. Jan 26 '13 at 14:15
1  
Not tens at all. mdpi, hdpi, xhdpi for phones; hdpi-sw600dp, xhdpi-sw600dp for tablets; maybe if you really need more control, also add xhdpi-sw720dp for high-res 10" tablets. That's a total of 6 buckets. Where are the tens of them ? But also, remember, that's only if you need really fine grain control over the drawables, like custom backgrounds or large drawables that need to stretch on the whole screen. For launcher icons and actionbar icons that don't need stretching, the default phone buckets would suffice. You're over-complicating things... –  Andrew Jan 27 '13 at 10:12
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