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I just got an example from a book

Controller:

[HttpPost]
public ViewResult RsvpForm(GuestResponse guestResponse)
{
   // TODO: Email guestResponse to the part organizer
   return View("Thanks", guestResponse);
}

View:

@model MvcApplication1.Models.GuestResponse 
@{
    ViewBag.Title = "Thanks";
}
<div>
    <h1>Thank you, @Model.Name!</h1>

    @if (Model.WillAttend == true)
    {
        @:It's great that you're coming. The drinks are already in the fridge!
    }
    else
    {
        @:Sorry to hear that you can't make it, but thanks for letting us know.
    }
</div>

I believe that this approach is against concept of separating view and model / controller logic.

My approach is:

controller:

  [HttpPost]
    public ViewResult RsvpForm(GuestResponse guestResponse)
    {
        ViewResult v = View("Thanks");
        v.ViewBag.Name = guestResponse.Name;

        if (guestResponse.WillAttend)
        {
            v.ViewBag.Message = "It's great that you're coming. The drinks are already in the fridge!";
        }
        else
        {
            v.ViewBag.Message = "Sorry to hear that you can't make it, but thanks for letting us know.";
        }

        return v;
    }

View:

@{
    ViewBag.Title = "Thanks";
}
<div>
    <h1>Thank you, @ViewBag.Name!</h1>

    @ViewBag.Message;

</div>

The purpose of this "question" is to clarify that view should be used for viewing and controller for controlling what to show, and that a book example is "bad approach" (I'm considering the fact that the author just wanted to show abilities of MVC)

Now is using strongly typed Views (with logic code) really that good idea, or is it going back to sort of ASP spaghetti code?

Please give some good feedback considering high quality enterprise design

Update: I know it's trivial example, there is no validation ans such, but would it be a good practice (for the sake of this example) to put the logic in the model, and then on the view just access the result like:

@Model.Message
share|improve this question
    
If I would read a few more chapters I would get the answers. I'm so impatient. “Views contain the logic required to display elements of the model to the user, and nothing more.” Thanks everybody for the feedback –  Pawel Cioch Jan 22 '13 at 15:13
    
Whoever has the rights, can mark this "question" as closed/answered/deleted –  Pawel Cioch Jan 22 '13 at 15:21

3 Answers 3

Separation of concerns is not about coupling per se, but rather delineating who is responsible for what. Creating UI elements in the controller violates separation of concern, populating data does not. There is, of necessity, some required coupling between controller and view. After all the controller action MUST supply the data that the view uses to generate the UI. Generally I favor strongly typed views and model-per-view when doing MVC. This gives me the benefits of strongly-typed data in my view code. In practice, there is typically a mix of a strongly-typed view model coupled with some ViewBag data for cross-cutting concerns.

As far as using logic in views I would say "it depends." I've used separate views, a view that chooses between several partials (based on model data), control-of-flow to choose HTML variants. The choice of which method depends on how much differs between the models/views. If the logic is only around choosing UI display, I'm comfortable leaving it in the view. I'd much rather have that then push the choices back into the controller. That would violate separation of concerns.

share|improve this answer
    
very well put!!! –  Dave Alperovich Jan 21 '13 at 22:56

Using code within the view isn't the same thing as having strongly typed views. You can easily have either one without the other. Strongly typed views have several advantages and is not in itself a violation of separation of concerns.

Using branched code within a view can be a code-smell, and may in fact violate separation of concerns, but that really depends on what the code is trying to do. In the case you presented, I would argue that it's not a violation since the string used in the view exists strictly for presentation purposes.

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as tvanfosson explained succinctly, the Separation of Concerns comes from decoupling of Controller and View.

As opposed to web forms and asp classic, MVC architecture separates the logical layer (Controller) from the presentation layer (View). As long as the code for each is in separate locations, we have achieved Separation of Concerns.

The Model is a passive medium for passing information from the Separated layers. Making the model strongly typed tightens the "contract" between the 2, but doesn't violate the separation. Your data access method could evolve from ADO to ORM without ever having to re-visit the View Code. Your ORM could be refactored to use a web service without changing the View at all.

Only if you decide to change the incoming or outgoing values for the View would you have to alter the View. And that, at core, is Separation of Concerns.

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