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I am trying to automate frontend tests with Selenium for a wicket based web application. Therefore I have: - Different languages - language property files (submit.signup.form=Submit) and wicket messages () using them - HTML pages which are generated by wicket (input type:button and value:Submit)

If I go ahead and automate a test case with that, it will work properly. The problems start when somebody decides to change the property file to f.i. submit.signup.form=Send. If that happens I will have to adjust all Selenium tests to check for the correct label again to make a test successful (this is not really applicalbe for that example but for error messages it will be a problem)

Now the question:

Is there a way to make wicket to put the property key onto/into the generated html files?

Desired benefit: I can use Java and make Selenium take the property ke and check the property file for the text. That way a change of a label in the property file would not effect the Selenium tests at all and would make it much more easy to handle.

I am grateful for any answer. :)

Best regards

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By default, Wicket starts in development mode. In development mode you should see the wicket tags, you should take a look in to IDebugSettings , however you will not see the properties gathered from the java code, but you can add the key as attribute, for example

new Label(getString("propertieKey")).add(new AttributeAppender("key","propertieKey"))
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It's quite easy to do actually.

Put in your application init method:

    getResourceSettings().getStringResourceLoaders().add(0, new NoResourceLoader());

Implement NoResourceLoader:

public class NoResourceLoader implements IStringResourceLoader {

@Override
public String loadStringResource(Class<?> clazz, String key, Locale locale, String style, String variation) {
     if ("noProperties".equals(style)) {
         return key;
     }
     return null;
}

@Override
public String loadStringResource(Component component, String key, Locale locale, String style, String variation) {
     if ("noProperties".equals(style)) {
         return key;
     }
     return null;
}
}

This resource loader just returns the key if the style is set to noProperties. As it returns null, the localizer will try the next resourceloader for any other invocation.

In order to set style to "noProperties" I'd suggest adding a parameter check to your pages' constructor that would set the style on the session object when you call your application with the parameter.

public BasePage(PageParameters pp) {
    String style = pp.get("st").toOptionalString();
    if (style != null) {
        getSession().setStyle("noProperties");
    }

It would be enough to call your first url with this parameter set, then you should walk through the whole session with property keys instead of values in the html. I'd also disable this check when the app is running in production.

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