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So I have this list and variables:

nums = [14, 8, 9, 16, 3, 11, 5]

big = nums[0]

spot = 0

I'm confused on how to actually do it. Please help! I'm new to Python and I want to use this exercise to give me a starter. I want to start with "repeat length of list" like in Scratch or BYOB, but how do I do that on Python?

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5 Answers 5

Usually, you could just use

max(nums)

If you explicitly want to use a loop, try:

max_value = None
for n in nums:
    if n > max_value: max_value = n
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1  
What if a number was -2 in the list? –  alex Jan 21 '13 at 23:00
    
To add some explanation to the loop solution: To get the biggest number, you iterate through the list and remember the biggest number you have encountered so far. That way when you reach the end, you will have the biggest number of them all remembered. –  poke Jan 21 '13 at 23:00
1  
@alex You can set max = nums[0]; also max is not the best variable name for this. –  poke Jan 21 '13 at 23:01
    
Granted, the name max is ill-chosen. -1 an initial value fails, if all numbers in the list are < -1. I edited the post accordingly. –  helmbert Jan 21 '13 at 23:07
    
(int) > None will raise a TypeError. –  poke Jan 22 '13 at 6:30
nums = [14, 8, 9, 16, 3, 11, 5]

big = None

spot = None

for i, v in enumerate(nums):
    if big is None or v > big:
         big = v
         spot = i
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+1 for enumerate and actually finding the spot. –  poke Jan 21 '13 at 23:02
1  
For bonus points, make sure nums is not empty before assigning big = nums[0], and if so, raise an exception (ValueError would be a good choice). –  Paul McGuire Jan 21 '13 at 23:12

Here you go...

nums = [14, 8, 9, 16, 3, 11, 5]

big = max(nums)
spot = nums.index(big)

This would be the Pythonic way of achieving this. If you want to use a loop, then loop with the current max value and check if each element is larger, and if so, assign to the current max.

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but there is no loop - at least not explicite –  Theodros Zelleke Jan 21 '13 at 22:58
    
@TheodrosZelleke for i in range(len(list)): # for loop iterates through it. That's an explicit way of repeating something for the length of the list. This will work for indices; if you want to do something x amount of times, the range() 'end' argument should be x + 1. So to do something x amount of times where x is the length of the list, do: for i in range(len(list) + 1):. –  F3AR3DLEGEND Jan 21 '13 at 23:21
    
@F3AR3DLEGEND, thanks for the clarification -- however, my comment was meant as a "kind of criticism" not a question. –  Theodros Zelleke Jan 21 '13 at 23:29
    
for i in nums: return max(nums) :p –  Ryan Haining Jan 22 '13 at 0:08
    
@F3AR3DLEGEND list is a builtin function, best not to use it as a variable name. and you're better off doing for i, _ in enumerate(seq) rather than range(len(seq)) –  Ryan Haining Jan 22 '13 at 0:11

Why not simply using the built-in max() function:

>>> m = max(nums)

By the way, some answers to similar questions might be useful:

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OP explicitly stated (s)he wanted a loop. –  F3AR3DLEGEND Jan 21 '13 at 23:07

To address your second question, you can use a for loop:

for i in range(len(list)):
    # do whatever

You should note that range() can have 3 arguments: start, end, and step. Start is what number to start with (if not supplied, it is 0); start is inclusive.. End is where to end at (this has to be give); end is exclusive: if you do range(100), it will give you 0-99. Step is also optional, it means what interval to use. If step is not provided, it will be 1. For example:

>>> x = range(10, 100, 5) # start at 10, end at 101, and use an interval of 5
>>> x
[10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55, 60, 65, 70, 75, 80, 85, 90, 95] # note that it does not hit 100

Since end is exclusive, to include 100, we could do:

>>> x = range(10, 101, 5) # start at 10, end at 101, and use an interval of 5
>>> x
[10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55, 60, 65, 70, 75, 80, 85, 90, 95, 100] # note that it does hit 100
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