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My application consists of several components, inheriting from an abstract base class. Except this the two member functions which each component overwrites, no component has any public declarations.

class Component()
{
public:
    virtual void Init() = 0;
    virtual void Update() = 0;
};

Since there are no other public methods or members, does it make sense to create header files? Could that save compilation time or is there another way to do so?

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3  
That class you posted is an insanely silly idea. –  Pubby Jan 21 '13 at 23:02
1  
@Pubby: Why do you say that? –  Ed S. Jan 21 '13 at 23:04
3  
"Init" member functions are never a good idea –  Cat Plus Plus Jan 21 '13 at 23:12
2  
public Init members are always bad. –  Puppy Jan 21 '13 at 23:14
3  
This seems to be not only a largely useless interface but also one that promotes actively harmful design. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 21 '13 at 23:15
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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you do not use the class outside a single CPP file, you do not need a header. Otherwise, you can avoid writing a header file at your own risk: the potential losses (inconsistent re-declarations of the base class) far outweigh the potential wins (speeding up the compile time). The readability of the overall project is going to suffer as well - other readers of your project will expect to see a header there, and would be surprised to see multiple copies in different files.

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If you have many derived classes which derive from Component, you could put it in a separate header file: IComponent.h. I indicates interface which is abstract class in C++. This makes the code structure very clear.

Your code has UB as you haven't defined virtual destructor for abstract class:

class Component()
{
public:
    virtual ~Component();      
    virtual void Update() = 0;
};

You get undefined behavior if you delete an object of a derived type through a pointer to the base.

Also as @Griwes points out, just use constructor to initialise members, no need to have redundant virtual Init function.

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Thanks, I didn't know that. In my particular case no component pointer would be ever deleted (before exiting the application). But anyway I will update my source code. –  danijar Jan 21 '13 at 23:09
    
Now, add something about "Init() is silly, because in C++ you have constructors for that" and I will upvote you. –  Griwes Jan 21 '13 at 23:13
    
@Griwes good point, updated –  billz Jan 21 '13 at 23:15
    
Defining the class does not produce undefined behavior. Nor does deriving from that class. You get undefined behavior if you delete an object of a derived type through a pointer to the base. –  Pete Becker Jan 22 '13 at 1:02
    
@PeteBecker exactly right. I've this in my answer: If you use Component pointer to hold a derived object and delete the pointer, it's undefined behavior., but I like your words, I'll put it in my answer. –  billz Jan 22 '13 at 1:04
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No, it is not necessary to write header files.

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It's entirely up to how you are using the class. If you are using the derived class(es) only in one source-file, there is no particular reason to use a headerfile.

I wouldn't worry about compile time, unless you are running on a machine that is more than 10 years old. Modern machines cache disk reads very well, and you will most likely include several megabytes of other header files.

However, if you want to "reuse" your class in some other project, you've now made that quite hard.

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All components are only included in one files where an instance of each class is stored in a vector. Then Update() is called over the vector frequently. Compile time is bothers me since it takes around 30 seconds each time. –  danijar Jan 21 '13 at 23:07
    
I presume that's the total compile time to compile a fairly large project. ONE headerfile is not going to make a substantial change to the compile-time. –  Mats Petersson Jan 21 '13 at 23:12
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Creating headers is usually a good idea, even for a small program where the performance boost will not be spectacular. It's a good coding habit that you should acquire! :)

http://www.cplusplus.com/forum/articles/10627/

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