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Normally, people would use regexes to parse something else into an AST. What I'm looking for is a tool that I can use to parse the regex itself into an AST, which I can then manipulate symbolically. Let's say I have a regex like

(c(o)w)/(.*?)/omg

I want to be able to ask questions like

  • How many capturing groups are there?
  • Are there are nested groups?
  • Is the character ., 10th character in the regex, at the start of a capturing group?

And be able to manipulate the regex in some meaningful way, e.g:

  • Get the names of all named groups
  • Replace all named groups with un-named groups
  • Flatten any nested groups into their outer-most enclosing group

before serializing it back into a string.

I've poked around java.util.regex.Pattern, but it's internals are all private, so I don't have access to them. Are there any third party libraries which I can use to do this?

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No, you should NEVER use a regexp to "parse" anything but the simplest regular grammars. They are called "regular expressions" for a reason. –  SK-logic Feb 4 '13 at 8:39
1  
Nobody asked for a regexp to "parse" something. What are you talking about? –  Li Haoyi Feb 4 '13 at 10:26
    
I see, I did not read your question thoroughly. You want to parse regexps, not parse with regexps. Unlikely you'll find a ready to use library, but it should be trivial to implement your own. –  SK-logic Feb 4 '13 at 10:33
    
Yeah, I've come to that conclusion myself. I don't think it'll be trivial to do it on my own, but it looks like that's the way forward... –  Li Haoyi Feb 4 '13 at 14:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Have a look at my ANTLR based PCRE parser: https://github.com/bkiers/PCREParser

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I would use ANTLR to create a lexer/parser for regular expressions. Depending on how much of regular expression syntax you want to use, this may be easy to fairly complex. Antlr comes with a nice graphical editor where you can test the grammar file you are creating. The resulting AST is very easy to manipulate in a standard Java program. If you are new to Antlr, I would highly recommend the Antlr book by Terence.

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You could also mention about ANTLR plugin for Eclipse antlrv3ide.sourceforge.net. Very good recommendation (+1) –  Tom Jan 21 '13 at 23:37
    
I've considered using ANTLR; I'm using Scala, so I also have the parser-combinator library available. My first choice would be some already made library though (if it exists!), since I hope to avoid becoming an expert in the intricacies regex grammar to do basic manipulation. –  Li Haoyi Jan 22 '13 at 0:28

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