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I have created a static event inside of a class that I would like to subscribe to from other classes.

public class PlaylistModel 
{
    public static event EventHandler PlaylistLoadError;
    public static void LoadPlaylist() 
    {
        try 
        {    
           // ...do some stuff...
        } 
        catch(SomeException ex) 
        {
            EventHandler handler = PlaylistLoadError;

            if(handler != null) 
            {
                PlaylistLoadError(null, null);
            }
        }
    }
}

And in my other class....

public partial class MainPage : PhoneApplicationPage 
{
    public MainPage() 
    {
        PlaylistModel.PlaylistLoadError += PlaylistError;
    }

    public void PlaylistError(object sender, EventArgs args) 
    {
        //... show the error ...
    }
}

Inside of the catch, handler is null, despite it being subscribed to. I have debugged the program from within MainPage AFTER the catch has been executed, and PlaylistLoadError is shown as not being null. Any ideas why it would be null inside of PlaylistModel, but not anywhere else? I have a feeling it has something to do with it being static.

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2 Answers 2

The value of an event field can be null if nobody has subscribed to it. From your comments, it seems like the exception in your PlaylistModel class is thrown before the MainPage class is constructed at which point nobody has subscribed to the event yet.

Also please note that this is a recipe for memory leaks. When your MainPage class (or any other class) subscribes to the event, the Playlist class holds a reference to it and the event in the Playlist class is static. As such, all subscribed members to the event will live for the lifetime of your application.

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Thanks for your reply. I'm positive it gets subscribed to because I watch it go by in the debugger. This even happens when the catch block is executed multiple times. –  finkonkanonk Jan 21 '13 at 23:36

The value of the event delegate is copied when you assign it to a variable, but is likely null by the time you raise it:

EventHandler handler = PlaylistLoadError;

if(handler != null) { // not null
    PlaylistLoadError(null, null); // null
}

You can avoid the error by executing your local variable rather than re-obtaining the delegate from the event:

EventHandler handler = PlaylistLoadError;

if(handler != null) {
    handler(this, EventArgs.Empty);
}

this and EventArgs.Empty are also better defaults than null

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Unfortunately, PlaylistLoadError is in fact null. Any other ideas? –  finkonkanonk Jan 22 '13 at 3:26
    
I set a breakpoint in MainPage and in LoadPlaylist to check the memory addresses of PlaylistLoadError. The static PlaylistLoadError referenced in MainPage is at one address, while the static PlaylistLoadError referenced in the (static) LoadPlaylist function is at another address. Why would this be? –  finkonkanonk Jan 22 '13 at 3:45
    
@finkonkanonk - How is PlaylistModel.LoadPlaylist called? –  Richard Szalay Jan 22 '13 at 4:05
    
It is called from other classes: PlaylistModel plist = PlaylistModel.LoadPlaylist(); –  finkonkanonk Jan 22 '13 at 23:43
    
@finkonkanonk - In that case, it's probably as simple as the Page_Load event on MainPage not having fired yet when LoadPlaylist is called. –  Richard Szalay Jan 23 '13 at 1:38

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