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Well, when you hold a key on your keyboard, after the first fire there is a 1sec delay.
You can go ahead and open notepad and hold a key (e.x 'x') you'll see after the first fire there is a delay.

However, I'm trying to develop a game in HTML5 Canvas with JavaScript, and that 1sec delay is very annoying, Additionally, it stops the player walking animation..

So how can I delete that annoying delay in JavaScript ( no jQuery! ) ??

My keydown event works in this pattern -

document.onkeydown = getKey;
function getKey(e) {
    switch(e.keyCode) {
        case 38: // UP
            Player.PositionY--;
        break;
        case 39: // RIGHT
            Player.PositionX++;
        break;
        case 40: // DOWN
            Player.PositionY++;
        break;
        case 37: // LEFT
            Player.PositionX--;
        break;
    }
}

Thanks in Advance :)

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1  
There is a simple solution: Don't rely on OS repeating, roll your own event loop that polls your keyboard class (optionally: only if there is something happening). –  Jan Dvorak Jan 21 '13 at 23:26
    
@JanDvorak Yeah I've got that thanks :) –  Israel G. Jan 21 '13 at 23:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

you could start an event on keydown and stop it on keyup

$('#mycanvas').on('keydown', function() { 
   $(document).trigger('start'); 
}); 

$('#mycanvas').on('keyup', function() { 
   $(document).trigger('stop'); 
});

$(document).on('start', startAnimation);
$(document).on('stop', stopAnimation);

function startAnimation(e) { //start something }
function stopAnimation(e) { //stop something }
share|improve this answer
    
how it should help? if the user will hold a key the keyup event won't even fire.. –  Israel G. Jan 21 '13 at 23:26
1  
@IsraelG. then the event (setInterval) should run indefinitely. –  Jan Dvorak Jan 21 '13 at 23:27
2  
isn't that the idea? you want to get rid of the delay, right? if that's the case, start an event that will run until keyup –  Jason Jan 21 '13 at 23:27
1  
@JanDvorak ...i'm not sure what you mean. see my edits –  Jason Jan 21 '13 at 23:36
    
Why the extra level of indirection? –  Jan Dvorak Jan 21 '13 at 23:40

Instead, listen for when the key is first pressed, and then listen for when it's released. This also means that you have to record the current state of movement speed somewhereso you can apply it between those events.

This example will only server for walking forward, it should be easy to extend to the other directions.

var playerSpeed = 0;

document.onkeydown = keyDown;
document.onkeyup = keyUp;

function keyDown(e) {
    switch(e.keyCode) {
        case 38: // UP
            playerSpeed = 1; // moving!
            break;
        // other cases...
    }
}

function keyUp(e) {
    switch(e.keyCode) {
        case 38: // UP
            playerSpeed = 0; // NOT moving!
            break;
        // other cases...
    }
}

// Whatever loop is called for each frame or game tick
function updateLoop() {
  // rendering, updating, whatever, per frame
  Player.PositionY += playerSpeed;
}

This way, it doesn't matter what the repeat rate of the keyboard is. Every onkeydown, will always eventually have an onkeyup. All you have to do and update things a different way inbetween those events.

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You're lucky, I just code this for a game.

Controller = {
    keyIsDown: [],

    // Add a new control. up is optional.
    // It avoids key repetitions
    add: function (key, down, up) {
        $(document).keydown(function(e) {
            if(e.keyCode === key && !Controller.keyIsDown[key]) {
                    down()
                Controller.keyIsDown[key] = true
                return false
            }
        })

        $(document).keyup(function(e) {
            if(e.keyCode === key) {
                if(up) up()
                Controller.keyIsDown[key] = false
                return false
            }
        })
    },
}

Example:

Controller.add(65,
    function () {
        console.log("A is down")
    },
    // This argument is optional
    function () {
        console.log("A is up")
})
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