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I've thought of this pattern which allows to use base class as a namespace for its derivatives, which may be neat if all your derivatives are known beforehand. One case where this could look nice is when you want to use adjectives for your subclasses. Does this pattern have a name?

class Flag
{
public:
  class White;
  class Chequered;
  // ...
};

class Flag::White: public Flag
{
  // ...
};

class Flag::Chequered: public Flag
{
  // ...
};
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Worth comparing to the letter-envelope pattern, given the prior knowledge of derivatives. Clearly one could combine the two. – Keith Jan 22 '13 at 0:37

Using a class as a namespace is an anti-pattern. Use namespace instead.

Nested classes can't be the subject of a using declaration, so without a typedef you'll have no choice but to refer to Flag::Chequered and not Chequered in client code. As you mentioned, all the derivatives must be known beforehand. They can't be forward declared without a definition of class Flag. Simply having an enclosing namespace has benefits like allowing you to apply operators from std::relops to the cluster of classes.

Aesthetics never makes up for language abuse. Here's an alternative:

namespace flags {
class Base;
class White;
class Chequered;
}

typedef flags::Base Flag; // independent concept goes into enclosing namespace

I don't know of a name for the practice of using adjectives to name classes, but it looks nice. Short names are good, and the :: operator always helps with that.

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Classes have namespace-like properties, and it may be desirable to utilize those properties from time to time. If you use a namespace Flag in this example, you'd have to put the base class in that namespace too, so you would have to have Flag::Base instead of just Flag. – dragonroot Jan 22 '13 at 0:49
    
@dragonroot updated answer. – Potatoswatter Jan 22 '13 at 2:00

They're called extremely complicated namespaces without actually using the keyword namespace.

The concept itself is called an Inner class though, and not uncommon in some languages like Java.

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1  
According to that article, "inner class" refers to the Java construct which is not static, and the C++ construct is simply called a nested class, even in Java. "An instance of a normal or top-level class can exist on its own. By contrast, an instance of an inner class cannot be instantiated without being bound to a top-level class." – Potatoswatter Jan 22 '13 at 0:40

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