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I'm pretty sure I'm missing something as far as context, but I just can't figure out what.

I have the following ViewModel:

var ViewModel = function(){
    var self = this;
    self.person = ko.observable();
    self.isPerson = ko.observable();

    self.person.subscribe(function(value){
        self.isPerson('firstName' in value);
    });
};

var vm = new ViewModel();
var personA = { };
var personB = { firstName: ko.observable("hello") };

vm.person(personA);
ko.applyBindings(vm);
setTimeout(function(){ vm.person(personB); }, 1000);

and the following View:

<span data-bind="with: person">
    <!-- ko if: $root.isPerson -->
        <span data-bind="text: firstName"></span> 
    <!-- /ko -->    
</span>

JSFiddle

Once the timeout executes, I'd expect the firstName to be shown in the view, however, I get the following error:

 firstName is not defined;

If I start out with personB in the viewModel, it works. If I move the if statement above the with statement, it works.

What am I doing wrong in this scenario?

Updated JSFiddle

share|improve this question
    
What are you trying to achieve? It's an odd knockout pattern you're using... –  Peter H. Jan 22 '13 at 0:44
    
I think your code is following this execution path. 1. Create the view model with person as an observable, isPerson as an observable and subscribe to a change to the person 2. Put an empty object into the person 3. Apply the bindings to your view model with person A 4. Timeout, this time overwriting your person with a brand new observable, that hasn't been subscribed to. 5. Execute the subscribed function, on the previous object (without the firstName). –  Peter H. Jan 22 '13 at 1:05
    
Sorry, it's a bit of a contrived example. Initially, I had two objects that vary slightly, and wanted person on the viewModel to handle both. (A better example would have been maybe personA = Customer and personB = Employee). Then it just started bugging me that I couldn't figure out why it wasn't working. –  Mike Davis Jan 22 '13 at 1:11
    
OK - I think it's not working because you've overwritten the observable that you had subscribed to with a new observable. –  Peter H. Jan 22 '13 at 1:18
    
I've updated the JSFiddle with an example that is a bit more explanatory than the first. –  Mike Davis Jan 22 '13 at 1:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

i don't think you're doing anything wrong. the problem is the "if" binding to the root.isEmployee is being applied before the binding to the "with" is being updated. so the code is seeing the update to the isEmployee and then re-evaluating the view from there down, but the current context is still the old person (as that subscription hasn't fired).

this is proven via a custom binding in http://jsfiddle.net/drdamour/X6pC9/2/ notice the update receives 2 events, once with the old value cause the isEmployee was updated, and second time with the updated new value. this second update comes from the "with" binding subscription being triggered. The subscription of the 'with' binding happens during the applyBindings call, which happens AFTER your model does a subscription.

you can use $data.PropertyName trick to deal with undefined not causing issues. Ala: http://jsfiddle.net/drdamour/X6pC9/1/

<span data-bind="with: person">
    <span data-bind="text: firstName"></span> 
    <!-- ko if: $root.isEmployee -->
        <span data-bind="text: $data.employeeId"></span> 
        <span data-bind="text: $data.employer"></span> 
    <!-- /ko -->    
</span>

the RIGHT way to solve this is to have a PersonVM that has the isEmployee computed, that way you don't bind to the root. see: http://jsfiddle.net/drdamour/eVXTF/1/

<span data-bind="with: person">
    <span data-bind="text: firstName"></span> 
    <!-- ko if: isEmployee -->
        <span data-bind="text: $data.employeeId"></span> 
        <span data-bind="text: $data.employer"></span> 
    <!-- /ko -->    
</span>

and

var ViewModel = function(){
    var self = this;
    self.person = ko.observable();
};

var PersonVM = function()
{
    var self = this;
    this.firstName = ko.observable();
    this.employeeId = ko.observable();
    this.employer = ko.observable();

    self.isEmployee = ko.computed(function(){return self.employer() != null});
}

var vm = new ViewModel();
var customer = new PersonVM();
customer.firstName("John");

var employee = new PersonVM();
employee.firstName("Bill");
employee.employeeId(123);
employee.employer("ACME");

vm.person(customer);
ko.applyBindings(vm);
setTimeout(function(){ vm.person(employee); }, 3000);

computed is preferred to subscribe methods as it deals with the subscription chain for you and abstracts you away from having to manage all that.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much. Any idea why the $data trick works? –  Mike Davis Jan 22 '13 at 16:34
    
because $data can be resolved by the binder always, and you can always get a non-existent property of an object, it just returns undefined, and the text binding treats undefined as empty text. It would only not work if $data was null...i think. –  Chris DaMour Jan 22 '13 at 17:48
    
+1. My head hurts trying to get my head around ko bindings. –  Peter H. Jan 24 '13 at 0:41

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