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I inherited some code and am trying to make sense of this. The only time I have seen syntax like this (putting something in parentheses next to a variable) is in type casting. I can't see any instance of $var2 yet (probably in a script calling the function somewhere). What could this be?

Here is what I see in the code:

$var1 = $arrayName['element']($var2);
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$var2 might be created per reference, if the named function was declared like function xyz( & $output); – mario Jan 22 '13 at 0:41
    
@mario - If that's the way it was done, the original author of this code should be fired. – Joseph Silber Jan 22 '13 at 0:44
    
@Joseph ... or forced to maintain it for all eternity. Though there are some useful cases for references, this looks fiddly indeed. – mario Jan 22 '13 at 0:45
1  
@mario - ...not for using references, but for using both a reference and a return value in the same function. – Joseph Silber Jan 22 '13 at 0:47
    
Guys, stop speculating about the motive of the original author if all you know is one single paraphrased line of code, as told by an unexperienced coder. – Sven Jan 22 '13 at 0:51
up vote 1 down vote accepted

It is calling a function from the array. It's stored in the array either as a string with the function's name, or the function itself is stored in there.

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Not actually an anonymous function. It might be just a function name – zerkms Jan 22 '13 at 0:38
    
Thanks, I see the function declaration now. Didn't think to look for it--was expecting a string value. – JohnCharles117 Jan 22 '13 at 0:52

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