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I implemented my repository pattern and unit of work in the following way:

and I was asked if create multiple instance of my database (which is the unit of work) will cause memory leak? and what are the downside of such implementation? or is the implementation done right?

Thanks.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What you should worry about is the creation of the DbContext as this is expensive. I typically use one DbContext per request instead of creating multiple DbContext instances everywhere.

I store it in the HttpContext object and dispose of it at the end of the request.

You can find more info on it here

Find below my modified implementation. (original was from the link above and used ObjectContext).

My context class

using System.Data.Entity;
using System.Data.Objects;
using System.Web;
using Fot.Admin.Models;

namespace Context
{
    public static class ContextManager
    {
        internal const string DB = "MY_DB_CONTEXT";

        /// <summary>
        /// Get an instance that lives for the life time of the request per user and automatically disposes.
        /// </summary>
        /// <returns>Model</returns>  
        public static T AsSingleton<T>() where T : DbContext, new()
        {
            HttpContext.Current.Items[DB] = (T)HttpContext.Current.Items[DB] ?? new T();
            return (T)HttpContext.Current.Items[DB];
        }


    }
}

My Context Module

using System;
using System.Data.Entity;
using System.Data.Objects;
using System.Web;

namespace Context
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Entity Module used to control an Entities DB Context over the lifetime of a request per user.
    /// </summary>
    public class ContextModule : IHttpModule
    {
        private const string DB = ContextManager.DB;


        void context_EndRequest(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            Dispose();
        }


        #region IHttpModule Members

        public void Dispose()
        {
            if(HttpContext.Current != null)
            {
                if (HttpContext.Current.Items[DB] != null)
                {
                    var entitiesContext = (DbContext) HttpContext.Current.Items[DB];

                    entitiesContext.Dispose();
                    HttpContext.Current.Items.Remove(DB);

                }

            }
        }

        public void Init(HttpApplication context)
        {
            context.EndRequest += new EventHandler(context_EndRequest); 
        }

        #endregion

    }
}

In my web.config under <httpModules> i add this below.

<add name="ContextModule" type="Context.ContextModule" />

This ensures that the end_Request is called after every request so you can dispose the context properly.

When you need the DbContext usage is as below.

 var Context = ContextManager.AsSingleton<MyDBContext>();
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in my unit of work implementation, i have a DbContext property and the same DbContext is passed into the repository constructor. Does that mean i'm using on DbContext? –  JeeShen Lee Jan 22 '13 at 1:41
    
and do you have the example of how to store DbContext in HttpContext? thanks. –  JeeShen Lee Jan 22 '13 at 1:42
    
This is not correct - DbContext is not expensive to instantiate. –  Pawel Jan 22 '13 at 1:48
    
@Pawel I am not an EF expert by any stretch but i think i'll go with the advice of the vendor of EFProf (link above) :) –  scartag Jan 22 '13 at 1:51
    
@JeeShenLee I've modifid my answer to include my implementation. –  scartag Jan 22 '13 at 1:51

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