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I have a column named MR which is a varchar. When I run a query with an ORDER BY it doesn't seem to be ordered correctly.

select MR, LName, FName from users 
  where MR between 'MR20001' and 'MR20002' 
  order by MR

Results:

MR20001   | LINA  | MARY
MR200011  | TEST  | CASE
MR20002   | KO    | MIKE

Why does MR200011 show before MR20002?

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...which is a varchar ____ what? 32? 255? MAX? –  Aaron Bertrand Jan 22 '13 at 2:36
1  
I have rolled back your question to the way it was originally. Once you have accepted an answer, changing the content of the question (so as to make the answer incorrect) is not a good practice. Besides, you have re-asked the question here (with the extra information): stackoverflow.com/questions/14497692/… –  Steve Mayne Jan 24 '13 at 20:00

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try casting it,

select MR, LName, FName 
from users 
where MR between 'MR20001' and 'MR20002' 
order by CAST(REPLACE(MR, 'MR', '') AS INT)
share|improve this answer

Because MR is a string, and - for example - 24 sorts lower than 3 since it does not care about the numeric value. This would be like sorting Smith before Azlea because z > m.

If you want to treat just the number as a number, then perhaps don't store the MR prefix. Based on the column name this seems completely redundant. Why not store the numeric portion alone as an INT and create a view that appends the 'MR' at runtime? You can easily do this without really affecting the app (add an instead of trigger if you can't control insert/update operations via a stored procedure):

CREATE VIEW dbo.users_appended
AS
    SELECT MR = 'MR' + CONVERT(VARCHAR(25), MR), 
        MRSort = MR --, ... other columns ...
      FROM dbo.users;
GO

SELECT MR, other columns
  FROM dbo.users_appended
  ORDER BY MRSort;

If you can't change the schema, you can say:

ORDER BY CONVERT(BIGINT, SUBSTRING(MR, 3, 25));

But I really don't think you should have MR stored in there at all. If you can't change this then maybe consider a view or a computed column that pulls out the numeric part of the string. You can even index a computed column if you are going to commonly order in only one direction.

ALTER TABLE dbo.users ADD MRNumber
  AS (CONVERT(BIGINT, SUBSTRING(MR, 3, 25))) PERSISTED;

CREATE INDEX ix_mrnumber ON dbo.users(MRNumber);

You will have to test if the work required to maintain the computed column and the index are justified by the difference this makes to the query.

A view would be similar, but you wouldn't gain any efficiencies from an index:

CREATE VIEW dbo.users_extended
AS
  SELECT MR, ..., MRNumber = CONVERT(BIGINT, SUBSTRING(MR, 3, 25));
GO

SELECT MR, ... 
  FROM dbo.users_extended
  ORDER BY MRNumber;

As for using LEN instead, be careful. While it is simpler code, it is not necessarily more efficient. On my system I created two tables with a wide distribution of values:

SELECT 'MR'+RTRIM(ABS(object_id)) AS MR 
  INTO dbo.flab 
  FROM sys.all_objects -- 2096 rows

SELECT 'MR'+RTRIM(ABS(s1.object_id)) AS MR 
  INTO dbo.mort 
  FROM sys.all_objects AS s1
  CROSS JOIN sys.all_objects AS s2; -- 4397409 rows

Now, testing simple queries like this:

SELECT * FROM dbo.flab ORDER BY LEN(MR), MR;
SELECT * FROM dbo.flab ORDER BY CONVERT(BIGINT, SUBSTRING(MR, 3, 25));
SELECT * FROM dbo.mort ORDER BY LEN(MR), MR;
SELECT * FROM dbo.mort ORDER BY CONVERT(BIGINT, SUBSTRING(MR, 3, 25));

Results on a heap (pay close attention to duration and CPU, in spite of the nonsense SQL Server spits out in terms of estimated cost):

enter image description here

And with a clustered index on MR:

enter image description here

I've also changed all my calculations to BIGINT to avoid any potential danger that the substring is more than 12 characters (and still avoids an expensive - yes, expensive - LEN()). Note that the estimated costs are 50/50 and the duration differences are about the same if INT is used instead of BIGINT (assuming that it is safe to use INT - which I think is a safe assumption since the accepted answer would have failed if there were any larger values).

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Aaron, what program/plug-in do you use to get cost of the queries as on the screenshots? I use system views for this but work with them is not very convenient. Thank you. –  Igor Jan 22 '13 at 4:42
    
@Igor SQL Sentry Plan Explorer –  Aaron Bertrand Jan 22 '13 at 4:45
    
@AaronBertrand what if the format of the MR column is not uniformed? What I mean to say is that if there is an additional entry with an 08-4567814 as MR. I can't use the substring in that case. –  jr17 Jan 25 '13 at 1:48
    
@jr17 thanks for wasting everyone's time by asking half a question... –  Aaron Bertrand Jan 25 '13 at 3:42

To avoid all the expensive casting and replacing you can use this as an alternative:

select MR, LName, FName 
from Table1 
order by LEN(MR),MR

http://www.sqlfiddle.com/#!3/ae729/6

share|improve this answer
    
You don't think LEN is free, do you? :-) There's a reason I used 12 instead of LEN(MR) in my SUBSTRING definitions... –  Aaron Bertrand Jan 22 '13 at 2:51
    
While LEN certainly isn't free, LEN is faster than CONVERT(SUBSTRING()). Also, you don't know that the underlying number is never more than 10 digits, so hard-coding a 12 is very dangerous. –  Sebastian Meine Jan 22 '13 at 3:04
    
I think INT is a reasonable assumption, and no INT can be stored with > 10 digits. If it's BIGINT that's easy enough to fix. Also you'll notice that my suggestions involved more than just CONVERT(SUBSTRING()) at runtime... –  Aaron Bertrand Jan 22 '13 at 3:07
    
MR most likely stands for medical record number and as such is often more than 10 digits. Your suggestion involves adding a computed column that causes more IO and a index that could turn out useless when to may rows are included by the where clause. So I am still not sure where you see an advantage in your solution. -- All in all I am not certain why you are fighting so hard here. I did not in any way attack you. –  Sebastian Meine Jan 22 '13 at 3:11
2  
Please demonstrate how LEN() is faster than CONVERT(SUBSTRING()), as I seem to have done the opposite. If you're going to discredit other answers please have some data to back it up. –  Aaron Bertrand Jan 22 '13 at 3:24

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