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I want to override my CSS hover actions on a list of links when the container div, in this case #header, has an opacity of 0.5. I'm having a difficult time.

Here's my jQuery:

  jQuery(window).scroll(function() {
    if(jQuery(window).scrollTop() > 200) {
        jQuery("#header").css('opacity', '0.5');
    } else {
        jQuery("#header").css('opacity','1');
    }
  });

  if(jQuery("#header").css("opacity") != 1){
      jQuery("#nav li a").hover(function(){
        jQuery(this).css("color","rgba(63, 131, 202, 1)");
      });
  }

And here's my CSS:

#nav li a {
    color:rgba(63, 131, 202, 1);
    transition: color 1s;
    -webkit-transition: color 1s;
    -o-transition: color 1s;
    -moz-transition: color 1s;
}

#nav li a:hover {
    color:rgba(63, 131, 202, 0.7);
    transition: color 1s;
    -webkit-transition: color 1s;
    -o-transition: color 1s;
    -moz-transition: color 1s;
}

I've also tried overriding each transition with none in jQuery, but it's not working. How could I do this? Should I try when the opacity isn't 1, overriding all the none-hover attributes, then overriding the hover attributes like I did above? Not sure what to do.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'd suggest keeping as much of your styles in the CSS and simply modify a class on the elements that need to change (or on an element higher in the hierarchy, like body, if it's going to change several elements). Here's an example:

Javascript:

jQuery(window).scroll(function() {
    jQuery(document.body).toggleClass("scrolledDown", jQuery(window).scrollTop() > 200)
});

CSS

#nav li a {
    color:rgba(63, 131, 202, 1);
    transition: color 1s;
    -webkit-transition: color 1s;
    -o-transition: color 1s;
    -moz-transition: color 1s;
}

#nav li a:hover {
    color:rgba(63, 131, 202, 0.7);
    transition: color 1s;
    -webkit-transition: color 1s;
    -o-transition: color 1s;
    -moz-transition: color 1s;
}

#header {
    opacity: 1;
}

body.scrolledDown #header {
    opacity: 0.5;
}

body.scrolledDown #nav li a:hover {
    color: rgba(63, 131, 202, 1);
}

This will automatically manage your state and keeps your style and javascript separate, which is always nice. You don't have to add the class to the body element, but I did it here for the sake of a simple example and lack of knowledge of the rest of your DOM structure.

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Great answer. Thanks! The one thing I wonder is the best way to add scrolledDown to my #header div. –  Tom Maxwell Jan 22 '13 at 3:36
    
It depends. As you see, the nav's link hover requires that scrolledDown class to be in its hierarchy in order to affect it. If your #nav is a child (doesn't matter how deep) of your #header you can certainly add it to the #header div. Otherwise, you need to find a common ancestor. I picked body because I knew it would be a common ancestor regardless of your DOM. :) –  Marc Baumbach Jan 22 '13 at 3:37
    
Figured it out. I asked how to add it to my #header div because my attempts weren't working, but I forgot to add a semicolon. I'm serious. :) –  Tom Maxwell Jan 22 '13 at 4:09
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As a workaround you could well have more success with:

jQuery("#header").fadeTo(0, 0.5);

instead of:

jQuery("#header").css('opacity', '0.5');
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I'll try it. –  Tom Maxwell Jan 22 '13 at 3:09
    
fadeTo has some really weird issues. Scroll up and down here and you'll see what I mean: tommaxwell.co –  Tom Maxwell Jan 22 '13 at 3:11
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Stepping through your code in a debugger is useful in cases like this. In this particular scenario, you'd find out that jQuery.fn.css() returns a string even if you're querying a numeric css property, so you'll want to parseFloat() the result.

if(parseFloat(jQuery("#header").css("opacity")) != 1)

That being said, I'd strongly recommend abandoning querying against style properties altogether and using classes to manage your state instead. Presentation is not information! As a bonus, your link hovers could just be css-based overrides based on the class name rather than being javascript-powered hovers.

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Oh, really? I sorta thought that it would return a string, but got this idea from another SO thread. –  Tom Maxwell Jan 22 '13 at 3:07
    
Me in Chrome inspector just now: $('body').css('opacity') > "1" –  Clint Tseng Jan 22 '13 at 3:08
    
I'll have to start using that more often. –  Tom Maxwell Jan 22 '13 at 3:14
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