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Given this document class:

    public class Product
    {
        public string Id { get; set; }
        public string Name { get; set; }
        public SpecialType? DefaultOffer { get; set; }
        public Dictionary<SpecialType, string> Specials { get; set; }
    }

    public enum SpecialType
    {
        Something1,
        Something2
    }

And this view model that I wish to project from the above document:

    public class ProductSummary
    {
        public string Id { get; set; }
        public string Name { get; set; }
        public string SpecialOffer { get; set; }
    }

I have created the following index:

    public class ProductSummaries : AbstractIndexCreationTask<Product>
    {
        public ProductSummaries()
        {
            Map = products => from p in products
                              select new { p.Id, p.Name, p.DefaultOffer, p.Specials };

            TransformResults = (db, products) =>
                                from p in products
                                select new
                                {
                                    Id = p.Id,
                                    Name = p.Name,
                                    SpecialOffer = p.Specials[p.DefaultOffer.Value]
                                };
        }
    }

In simple terms, I want the view model to use whichever of the strings in the Specials dictionary is indicated by the current value of DefaultOffer.

The following unit test fails:

    [TestMethod]
    public void CanIndexIntoDictionary()
    {
        using (var documentStore = this.GetDocumentStore())
        {
            documentStore.ExecuteIndex(new ProductSummaries());

            // Store some documents
            using (var session = documentStore.OpenSession())
            {
                session.Store(new Product 
                { 
                    Id = "products/2", 
                    Name = "B", 
                    Specials = new Dictionary<SpecialType, string> 
                    { 
                        { SpecialType.Something1, "B1" }, 
                        { SpecialType.Something2, "B2" } 
                    }, 
                    DefaultOffer = SpecialType.Something2 
                 });
                 session.SaveChanges();
            }

            // Make sure it got persisted correctly
            using (var session = documentStore.OpenSession())
            {
                var b = session.Load<Product>("products/2");
                Assert.AreEqual("B2", b.Specials[b.DefaultOffer.Value]); // PASSES
            }

            // Now query and transform
            using (var session = documentStore.OpenSession())
            {
                var result = session.Query<Product, ProductSummaries>()
                    .Customize(x => x.WaitForNonStaleResults())
                    .AsProjection<ProductSummary>()
                    .ToList();

                Assert.AreEqual(1, result.Count);
                Assert.AreEqual("B2", result.First().SpecialOffer); // FAILS - actual is NULL
            }
        }
    }

What do I need to do to make this test pass?

* UPDATE *

By using Matt's suggestion (in the comments below) of having an Enum value that represents NONE we can modify his answer and get rid of the nullable enum. The whole model and index looks a lot cleaner.

    public enum SpecialType
    {
        None = 0,
        Something1,
        Something2
    }

    public class Product
    {
        public string Id { get; set; }
        public string Name { get; set; }
        public SpecialType DefaultOffer { get; set; }
        public Dictionary<SpecialType, string> Specials { get; set; }
    }

    public class ProductSummaries : AbstractIndexCreationTask<Product,ProductSummary>
    {
        public ProductSummaries()
        {
            Map = products => from p in products
                              select new { p.Name, SpecialOffer = p.Specials[p.DefaultOffer] };

            Store(x => x.SpecialOffer, FieldStorage.Yes);
        }
    }

Interestingly, this index eliminates the need for null checking and the like because RavenDB simply sets SpecialOffer to null when p.DefaultOffer is not a key contained in the Specials dictionary. (This is only true when p.Name is included in the Map.)

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You don't need a TransformResults section in the index. In fact, you're mapping quite a bit that you don't need.

  • Id is always mapped implicitly. It becomes __document_id in the index and raven hooks it up appropriately.
  • Name only needs to be mapped if you are going to filter or sort by it, which you're not doing in the test. You can put it back if you need it for the real world.
  • Similar to Name, you only need to map DefaultOffer and Specials if you are going to use them for other purposes. For the sake of demonstration and passing your unit test, I've removed them.

The only trickery required here is due to the nullable enum. Because of that, Raven has a hard time translating your query from c#. You can work around it with some creative null checks and use of the AsDocument method:

public class ProductSummaries : AbstractIndexCreationTask<Product, ProductSummary>
{
    public ProductSummaries()
    {
        Map = products => from p in products
                          let defaultOffer = AsDocument(p).Value<string>("DefaultOffer")
                          select new
                          {
                              SpecialOffer = defaultOffer == null ? null : AsDocument(p.Specials)[defaultOffer]
                          };

        Store(x => x.SpecialOffer, FieldStorage.Yes);
    }
}

Also note that the reason you were getting null on the special offer field before was because you were trying to project it from the index but it wasn't a stored field. Turning field storage on for that field will solve that part of the problem.

You don't need to store any of the other fields, because they already exist on the document - which is also a source of data for projection.

BTW - thanks for the unit test. It makes it much easier to debug and answer quickly. :)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks very much Matt. It seems the handling of nullable enums is fairly cumbersome if I need to revert to dealing with them as strings in all my indexes. Perhaps it is worth rethinking the Dictionary<Enum, ...> approach I was contemplating for many areas of the domain model. –  Phil Degenhardt Jan 22 '13 at 22:04
1  
I usually go for an enum with a specifically defined zero value, such as Empty, None or Default. –  Matt Johnson Jan 22 '13 at 22:07
    
Hmmm nice idea. –  Phil Degenhardt Jan 22 '13 at 22:12
    
On another note, the key purpose of the index was to provide a read model (a la CQRS) for use in a view. I was thinking simple indexes with a minimal Map and a TransformResult would be more storage efficient since it would not require projected data to be redundantly stored. If, as you say, the document is a source of data for projection, then can I use the above approach in the Transform rather than the Map? –  Phil Degenhardt Jan 22 '13 at 22:13
    
The index is the redundant storage. The best source of data is from the document. TransformResults isn't required for projections. The docs need better examples, I know. Remember, the Map defines what is indexed and it happens when you store a document in an eventually-consistent manner. The document is fully ACID when you save it (Load is always preferred over Query). TransformResults happens at runtime when you query the index, so it's the least efficient option. –  Matt Johnson Jan 22 '13 at 22:21

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