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I've been messing around with this for days. I have tables of Managers, Sites they are assigned to, and Growers that are assigned to those sites. I need to know how many growers a manager has. Managers are assinged to sites but not growers so I have to go through this drill to find out how many growers a particular manager has based on the grower assigned to each individual site he has. A site only has one grower. I can get the number of growers for a particular manager fairly easily but I want to return a single table containing the number of growers for each manager and I'm stumped.

I have the following code:

DECLARE @ManagerID     INT
DECLARE @getManagerID  CURSOR 
SET @getManagerID =  CURSOR FOR
SELECT ID
FROM   Managers

     OPEN @getManagerID
     FETCH NEXT
     FROM @getManagerID INTO @ManagerID
WHILE @@FETCH_STATUS = 0
BEGIN
    SELECT COUNT(Grower) AS NumGrowers
    FROM   Growers
    WHERE  Growers.ID IN 
    (
       SELECT sitesg.Grower
       FROM   SitesG
       WHERE  SitesG.id IN 
       (
          SELECT SITE
          FROM   ManagerSites
          WHERE  ManagerSites.Manager IN 
          (
             SELECT ID
             FROM Managers
             WHERE ID = @ManagerID
          )
       )
    )

    FETCH NEXT
    FROM @getManagerID INTO @ManagerID
END
     CLOSE @getManagerID
     DEALLOCATE @getManagerID

This gives me a bunch of results that I can probably store in a temporary table but there must be a better way. Any ideas?

-Joe

share|improve this question
    
This query does not require a cursor. However, when you do use cursors, please don't use the default options. See this post for more details: sqlperformance.com/2012/09/t-sql-queries/cursor-options –  Aaron Bertrand Jan 22 '13 at 4:58
    
Please how sample data and desired results so people don't waste time solving a long-winded and hard to follow word problem. –  Aaron Bertrand Jan 22 '13 at 10:12
    
Show, not how. Stupid phone. –  Aaron Bertrand Jan 22 '13 at 10:22

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Yes, please ditch the cursors and all the nested subqueries. This is exactly what joins are for...

SELECT ManagerID = m.ID, NumGrowers = COUNT(DISTINCT g.ID)
  FROM dbo.Managers AS m
  INNER JOIN dbo.ManagerSites AS s
  ON s.Manager = m.ID
  INNER JOIN dbo.SitesG AS sg
  ON s.SITE = sg.id
  INNER JOIN dbo.Growers AS g
  ON sg.Grower = g.ID
  GROUP BY m.ID;

In fact if all you care about is the ManagerID you can simplify this:

SELECT ManagerID = s.Manager, NumGrowers = COUNT(DISTINCT g.ID)
  FROM dbo.ManagerSites AS s
  INNER JOIN dbo.SitesG AS sg
  ON s.SITE = sg.id
  INNER JOIN dbo.Growers AS g
  ON sg.Grower = g.ID
  GROUP BY s.Manager;

As an aside, it is very confusing to be joining things like s.Manager = m.ID and sg.Grower = g.ID. Why don't you call things ManagerID, GrowerID etc. the same thing everywhere they appear in your model? That would certainly make these joins more intuitive.

share|improve this answer
    
Oops, I spoke too soon. What the above gives me are the total sites for each grower: 9 596 12 196 10 798 13 491 11 275 14 737 -Joe –  Joe Oliphant Jan 22 '13 at 7:04
    
Oops, I spoke too soon. What the above gives me are the total sites for each grower which I have gotten in a similar way and are: ManagerID Sites 9 596 12 196 10 798 13 491 11 275 14 737 I need the number of growers That each of theose sites have. For instance Manager 9 has 130 growers. -Joe –  Joe Oliphant Jan 22 '13 at 7:12
    
To give a little more information. A manager can have any number of sites and a grower can have any number of sites. A manager is assigned to lots of sites so I need to look up every site he has, then take all those sites and look up all the growers they have and toss out the duplicates. -Joe –  Joe Oliphant Jan 22 '13 at 7:19
    
That did it. You are most helpful. I knew it had to be something simple. I should have asked someone sooner. Thanks loads. - Joe –  Joe Oliphant Jan 22 '13 at 17:44
    
Oops, forgot about that. I think I have it checked now. -Joe –  Joe Oliphant Jan 22 '13 at 17:57

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