Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

JIT load assembly into memory when any methods of that assembly get called, but if some methods are used and some methods are unused in application of this assembly whether this methods still get loaded into memory?

Also if assemblies loaded into memory with lot of unused functions and methods will it effect performance of that application?

share|improve this question
    
Can we start with the fact that the JIT is not loading anything into memory? The whole linking is done way before the JIT gets involved. –  TomTom Jan 22 '13 at 6:19
    
@@Tom I agree. It will be hosing process or may be CLR that load assembly into memory, requesting you to kindly update about my second question i.e. if assemblies loaded into memory with lot of unused functions and methods will it effect performance of that application and if no than why as I think methods and functions of assemblies also occupy some space in memory –  user1888859 Jan 22 '13 at 6:26
add comment

4 Answers

As @Dennis said, Loading and JIT'ing are two different operations done by two different subsystems in the CLR. But they are dependent.

You have two questions in context, to answer them

  1. JIT doesn't load assembly, the loader does. The metadata of all the classes and its members are loaded in the memory, but the method as such is only JIT'ed on demand (means, when they are called).

  2. The JIT'ed methods don't stay long in memory, unless referenced by someone. The CLR will clean them up based on a clean up procedure. And if that method is needed at a later stage, the method is loaded and is recompiled (JIT'ed) again. So unused functions don't affect application performance in a ideal scenario.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Don't confuse assembly loading and JIT compilation.

Assembly being loaded once, when any type, defined in that assembly being used (it doesn't matter, how it being used - this can be a public field access, for example); but JIT compilation (that is translation from IL to machine instructions) occurs many times, when one or another method must be executed.

Assembly loading doesn't mean JIT compilation of every method in that assembly.

share|improve this answer
    
@@Dennis : Thanks for you update, but kindly tell me if assemblies loaded into memory with lot of unused functions and methods will it effect performance of that application and if no than why as I think methods and functions of assemblies also occupy some space in memory –  user1888859 Jan 22 '13 at 6:22
    
@user1888859: of course, assembly loading will affect memory usage of your application ("loading" means loading into memory). If your question is about "will my program being executed slower", than the answer "no, it will not". –  Dennis Jan 22 '13 at 6:31
add comment

Are you looking for performance counters on assemblies loaded into the AppDomain? This may be a good avenue for you in the Windows SDK there are some perf counters for this set of metrics - http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ekec01h3.aspx

You can run perfmon with the counters specified above to gather some comparison data against another application that you have, when looking at micro-optimizations like this its probably best to have a baseline metric and then modify and check performance degradation. Running perfmon

share|improve this answer
add comment

According to specs, CLR loads an assembly when any type of that assembly is being used for the first time. I think that there is no way to tell the CLR that only loads parts of the assembly, so all the types and methods (used or unused) will be loaded to memory, although the compilation (JIT-ing) will not happen until the type (or maybe method) is being used.

For performance considerations, I can tell that this does not affect performance but affects memory usage.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, but do not forget to say: in an academic way. Unless you have dozens of mb of assemblies... –  TomTom Jan 22 '13 at 6:38
    
@TomTom I don't get your point. What do you mean? –  MD.Unicorn Jan 22 '13 at 6:44
    
I think if an assembly contains multiple modules, it's possible to load a module in the assembly than the entire assembly as such. May be not ? –  Soundararajan Jan 22 '13 at 6:44
    
No, i mean that this is reegularly not relevant. Assembly size is normally (a) small and (b) I Think assembly load is via memory mapped filr or something, so it may or may not be in memory. –  TomTom Jan 22 '13 at 7:24
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.