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I am new to bash programming (grep/uniq/sort/etc...) and I am having trouble trying to remove duplicates from a file with the given format

--
name: joe
tag: 123
--
name: mike
tag: 000
--
name: dave
tag: 123
--
name: loopy
tag: 123
--

Basically what I want is to remove the duplicates in the file which have the same tag number, like this:

--
name: joe
tag: 123
--
name: mike
tag: 000
--
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1  
If name and tag were same line, that'd be easy... –  Roman Newaza Jan 22 '13 at 6:48
    
I agree... but they're not... –  unknown Jan 22 '13 at 6:49
    
You can easily get them on the same line by using either paste or xargs this will do the trick grep -v - file | xargs -n4 | sort -uk4 however the output isn't in the desired format. @Thor answers is best here. –  iiSeymour Jan 22 '13 at 9:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This task is a pretty good fit for awk. If you have gawk or mawk available, you can accomplish it by setting the record separator appropriately:

awk -v RS='--\n' -v ORS='--\n' '!h[$4]++' infile

Output:

--
name: joe
tag: 123
--
name: mike
tag: 000
--

This works by remembering which tags have been seen (h[$4]++), i.e. fourth element in each record. The bang (!) in front of the increment ensures that the condition is only true when h[$4] is zero, so the default rule ({ print $0 }) is only invoked the first time tag is seen.

A slightly shorter version:

awk '!h[$4]++' RS='--\n' ORS='--\n' infile

Edit - handle records where name fields have spaces

The field count would vary if the name field has spaces. You can handle this by doing the field splitting a bit differently:

awk '!h[$4]++' RS='--\n' ORS='--\n' FS='\n| *: *' infile
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1  
+1 Very nice... –  iiSeymour Jan 22 '13 at 9:09
awk '/name/{x=$0}/tag/{a[$0]++;if(a[$0]<2){print "--\n"x,"\n",$0"\n--"}}' your_file

tested below:

> cat temp
--
name: joe
tag: 123
--
name: mike
tag: 000
--
name: dave
tag: 123
--
name: loopy
tag: 123
--
> awk '/name/{x=$0}/tag/{a[$0]++;if(a[$0]<2){print "--\n"x,"\n",$0"\n--"}}' temp
--
name: joe 
 tag: 123
--
--
name: mike 
 tag: 000
--

/name/{store line in a variable here so that if the next tag is not a duplicate we can use this temporary variable.}

/tag/{build an associative array with the count of the line.more than one leads to a duplicate.so print only if the count is 1}

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Hey thanks! Can you elaborate a little more on what's going on. Looks crazy! –  unknown Jan 22 '13 at 7:00
    
Sweet stuff. Can you recommend any good tutorials on where I can start with bash programming? –  unknown Jan 22 '13 at 7:07
    
why dont you google it :google.com/… –  Vijay Jan 22 '13 at 7:16
1  
It is actually awk programming. GNU gawk has good tutorials... –  Basile Starynkevitch Jan 22 '13 at 8:26

If foobar is the file that contains the lines to remove duplicates:

awk '{ if (arry[$3]++ == 0) print $0; }' foobar

the $3 in the array says to remove duplicates based on the values in the 3rd column only. If you want to remove entire duplicated lines, use $0 instead.

Using awk this way has the added advantage of not changing the order of the input lines (which sort/uniq does).

share|improve this answer
    
Not even close. –  iiSeymour Jan 22 '13 at 8:59

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